Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Neurocognitive Outcomes in Survivors of Childhood Cancer

Neurocognitive Outcomes in Survivors of Childhood Cancer Objectives To review issues associated with neurocognitive outcome in survivors of pediatric cancer. Recommendations are made for future research directions. Methods A large body of literature pertaining to neurocognitive outcome in cancer survivors was reviewed. Brain development and methodological issues that provide challenges to conducting meaningful research in cancer outcomes also are discussed. Results Neurotoxic agents used in some cancer therapies produce permanent neurocognitive sequelae, especially in very young children. Conclusions The state of neurocognitive research for pediatric cancer survivors needs to move beyond empirical studies of neurocognitive sequelae to research that will identify individual patients at risk for neurocognitive morbidity. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Pediatric Psychology Oxford University Press

Neurocognitive Outcomes in Survivors of Childhood Cancer

Journal of Pediatric Psychology , Volume 30 (1) – Jan 1, 2005

Loading next page...
 
/lp/oxford-university-press/neurocognitive-outcomes-in-survivors-of-childhood-cancer-njBXhvYD0v

References (74)

Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2005
ISSN
0146-8693
eISSN
1465-735X
DOI
10.1093/jpepsy/jsi016
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Objectives To review issues associated with neurocognitive outcome in survivors of pediatric cancer. Recommendations are made for future research directions. Methods A large body of literature pertaining to neurocognitive outcome in cancer survivors was reviewed. Brain development and methodological issues that provide challenges to conducting meaningful research in cancer outcomes also are discussed. Results Neurotoxic agents used in some cancer therapies produce permanent neurocognitive sequelae, especially in very young children. Conclusions The state of neurocognitive research for pediatric cancer survivors needs to move beyond empirical studies of neurocognitive sequelae to research that will identify individual patients at risk for neurocognitive morbidity.

Journal

Journal of Pediatric PsychologyOxford University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2005

There are no references for this article.