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Occupation and Cancers of the Lung and Bladder: A Case-Control Study in Bombay

Occupation and Cancers of the Lung and Bladder: A Case-Control Study in Bombay Abstract Associations between occupation and cancers of the lung (n=246) and bladder (n=153) were examined in a case-control study. Controls (n=212) comprised cases of oral (75%) and pharyngeal cancers (13%) and non-neoplastic oral diseases (12%) at the same hospital. Only males were studied. A personal interview was conducted and a lifetime occupational history and information on demographic and relevant confounding factors including tobacco use were obtained. For lung cases, comparing ‘ever’ employed with ‘never’ employed in a particular occupation, significantly elevated risks (adjusted for smoking) were found for textile workers (odds ratio [OR]=1.99, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.3–3.6) and cooks (OR=4.48, 95% CI: 1.2–16.9). High risks were also observed among ship and dockyard workers (OR=2.87,95% CI: 0.8–10.1) and wood workers (OR=2.88,95% CI: 0.9–9.6). For bladder cancers, significantly elevated risk was observed only for chemical/pharmaceutical plant workers (OR=4.48; 95% CI: 1.2–16.5). Two other sets of risk estimates were obtained: one by comparison with a second unexposed group made up of occupations where there was little likelihood of exposure to any cancer–causing occupational agent, and the other by fitting logistic regression models to the data. All methods yielded similar risk estimates. Tobacco smoking but not tobacco chewing was a risk factor for both sites. This content is only available as a PDF. © International Epidemiological Association http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Epidemiology Oxford University Press

Occupation and Cancers of the Lung and Bladder: A Case-Control Study in Bombay

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© International Epidemiological Association
ISSN
0300-5771
eISSN
1464-3685
DOI
10.1093/ije/22.2.185
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Associations between occupation and cancers of the lung (n=246) and bladder (n=153) were examined in a case-control study. Controls (n=212) comprised cases of oral (75%) and pharyngeal cancers (13%) and non-neoplastic oral diseases (12%) at the same hospital. Only males were studied. A personal interview was conducted and a lifetime occupational history and information on demographic and relevant confounding factors including tobacco use were obtained. For lung cases, comparing ‘ever’ employed with ‘never’ employed in a particular occupation, significantly elevated risks (adjusted for smoking) were found for textile workers (odds ratio [OR]=1.99, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.3–3.6) and cooks (OR=4.48, 95% CI: 1.2–16.9). High risks were also observed among ship and dockyard workers (OR=2.87,95% CI: 0.8–10.1) and wood workers (OR=2.88,95% CI: 0.9–9.6). For bladder cancers, significantly elevated risk was observed only for chemical/pharmaceutical plant workers (OR=4.48; 95% CI: 1.2–16.5). Two other sets of risk estimates were obtained: one by comparison with a second unexposed group made up of occupations where there was little likelihood of exposure to any cancer–causing occupational agent, and the other by fitting logistic regression models to the data. All methods yielded similar risk estimates. Tobacco smoking but not tobacco chewing was a risk factor for both sites. This content is only available as a PDF. © International Epidemiological Association

Journal

International Journal of EpidemiologyOxford University Press

Published: Apr 1, 1993

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