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Planning for Biodiversity Conservation: Putting Conservation Science into Practice

Planning for Biodiversity Conservation: Putting Conservation Science into Practice Articles Planning for Biodiversity Conservation: Putting Conservation Science into Practice CRAIG R. GROVES, DEBORAH B. JENSEN, LAURA L. VALUTIS, KENT H. REDFORD, MARK L. SHAFFER, J. MICHAEL SCOTT, JEFFREY V. BAUMGARTNER, JONATHAN V. HIGGINS, MICHAEL W. BECK, AND MARK G. ANDERSON he growing recognition that the species A SEVEN-STEP FRAMEWORK FOR DEVEL- T extinction crisis has deepened and that there are limited conservation dollars to address this crisis has had a profound OPING REGIONAL PLANS TO CONSERVE BI- influence on the planning methods and conservation strate- gies of governmental and nongovernmental organizations. For OLOGICAL DIVERSITY, BASED UPON PRIN- example, World Wildlife Fund (WWF) and Conservation International have pinpointed priority ecoregions and bio- CIPLES OF CONSERVATION BIOLOGY AND diversity “hotspots,” respectively, that represent some of the ECOLOGY, IS BEING USED EXTENSIVELY BY most significant remaining regions for conserving the world’s biological diversity (Olson and Dinerstein 1998, Myers et al. THE NATURE CONSERVANCY TO IDENTIFY 2000). Both The Nature Conservancy (TNC) (Master et al. 1998) and World Wildlife Fund (Abell et al. 2000) have set con- PRIORITY AREAS FOR CONSERVATION servation priorities at the scale of large watersheds for fresh- water ecosystems in the United States. The National Gap Analysis Program http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png BioScience Oxford University Press

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References (64)

Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© 2002 American Institute of Biological Sciences
Subject
Overview Articles
ISSN
0006-3568
eISSN
1525-3244
DOI
10.1641/0006-3568(2002)052[0499:PFBCPC]2.0.CO;2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Articles Planning for Biodiversity Conservation: Putting Conservation Science into Practice CRAIG R. GROVES, DEBORAH B. JENSEN, LAURA L. VALUTIS, KENT H. REDFORD, MARK L. SHAFFER, J. MICHAEL SCOTT, JEFFREY V. BAUMGARTNER, JONATHAN V. HIGGINS, MICHAEL W. BECK, AND MARK G. ANDERSON he growing recognition that the species A SEVEN-STEP FRAMEWORK FOR DEVEL- T extinction crisis has deepened and that there are limited conservation dollars to address this crisis has had a profound OPING REGIONAL PLANS TO CONSERVE BI- influence on the planning methods and conservation strate- gies of governmental and nongovernmental organizations. For OLOGICAL DIVERSITY, BASED UPON PRIN- example, World Wildlife Fund (WWF) and Conservation International have pinpointed priority ecoregions and bio- CIPLES OF CONSERVATION BIOLOGY AND diversity “hotspots,” respectively, that represent some of the ECOLOGY, IS BEING USED EXTENSIVELY BY most significant remaining regions for conserving the world’s biological diversity (Olson and Dinerstein 1998, Myers et al. THE NATURE CONSERVANCY TO IDENTIFY 2000). Both The Nature Conservancy (TNC) (Master et al. 1998) and World Wildlife Fund (Abell et al. 2000) have set con- PRIORITY AREAS FOR CONSERVATION servation priorities at the scale of large watersheds for fresh- water ecosystems in the United States. The National Gap Analysis Program

Journal

BioScienceOxford University Press

Published: Jun 1, 2002

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