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Positive selection on the human genome

Positive selection on the human genome Positive selection has undoubtedly played a critical role in the evolution of Homo sapiens. Of the many phenotypic traits that define our species—notably the enormous brain, advanced cognitive abilities, complex vocal organs, bipedalism and opposable thumbs—most (if not all) are likely the product of strong positive selection. Many other aspects of human biology not necessarily related to the ‘branding’ of our species, such as host–pathogen interactions, reproduction, dietary adaptation and physical appearance, have also been the substrate of varying levels of positive selection. Comparative genetics/genomics studies in recent years have uncovered a growing list of genes that might have experienced positive selection during the evolution of human and/or primates. These genes offer valuable inroads into understanding the biological processes specific to humans, and the evolutionary forces that gave rise to them. Here, we present a comprehensive review of these genes, and their implications for human evolution. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Human Molecular Genetics Oxford University Press

Positive selection on the human genome

Human Molecular Genetics , Volume 13 (suppl_2) – Oct 1, 2004

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References (136)

Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
Human Molecular Genetics, Vol. 13, Review Issue 2 © Oxford University Press 2004; all rights reserved
ISSN
0964-6906
eISSN
1460-2083
DOI
10.1093/hmg/ddh253
pmid
15358731
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Positive selection has undoubtedly played a critical role in the evolution of Homo sapiens. Of the many phenotypic traits that define our species—notably the enormous brain, advanced cognitive abilities, complex vocal organs, bipedalism and opposable thumbs—most (if not all) are likely the product of strong positive selection. Many other aspects of human biology not necessarily related to the ‘branding’ of our species, such as host–pathogen interactions, reproduction, dietary adaptation and physical appearance, have also been the substrate of varying levels of positive selection. Comparative genetics/genomics studies in recent years have uncovered a growing list of genes that might have experienced positive selection during the evolution of human and/or primates. These genes offer valuable inroads into understanding the biological processes specific to humans, and the evolutionary forces that gave rise to them. Here, we present a comprehensive review of these genes, and their implications for human evolution.

Journal

Human Molecular GeneticsOxford University Press

Published: Oct 1, 2004

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