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Predictors of subjective versus objective cognitive functioning in patients with stable grades II and III glioma

Predictors of subjective versus objective cognitive functioning in patients with stable grades II... BackgroundStudies in cancer and noncancer populations demonstrate lower than expected correlations between subjective cognitive symptoms and cognitive functioning as determined by standardized neuropsychological tests. This paper systematically examines the association between subjective and objective cognitive functioning in patients with low-grade glioma and the associations of these indicators of cognitive function with clusters of sociodemographic, clinical, and self-reported physical and mental health factors.MethodsMultiple regression analyses with the subjective and 2 objective indicators of cognitive functioning as dependent variables and 4 clusters of predictor variables were conducted in 169 patients with predominantly low-grade glioma.ResultsCorrelations between the subjective and the 2 objective cognitive indicators were negligible (0.04) to low (0.24). Objective cognitive deficits were predominantly associated with sociodemographic (older age, lower education, male sex) and clinical (left hemisphere tumor) variables, while lower ratings of subjective cognitive function were more closely related to self-reported mental health symptoms (fatigue, lower mental well-being), physical (motor) dysfunction and female sex. Self-reported communication deficits were associated significantly with both subjective and objective dysfunction.ConclusionsWe recommend that both subjective and objective measures of cognitive functioning, together with a measure of psychological distress, be used for comprehensive neuropsychological assessments of patients with glioma to determine which areas are most affected and which specific intervention strategies are most appropriate. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Neuro-Oncology Practice Oxford University Press

Predictors of subjective versus objective cognitive functioning in patients with stable grades II and III glioma

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References (59)

Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
ISSN
2054-2577
eISSN
2054-2585
DOI
10.1093/nop/npu035
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

BackgroundStudies in cancer and noncancer populations demonstrate lower than expected correlations between subjective cognitive symptoms and cognitive functioning as determined by standardized neuropsychological tests. This paper systematically examines the association between subjective and objective cognitive functioning in patients with low-grade glioma and the associations of these indicators of cognitive function with clusters of sociodemographic, clinical, and self-reported physical and mental health factors.MethodsMultiple regression analyses with the subjective and 2 objective indicators of cognitive functioning as dependent variables and 4 clusters of predictor variables were conducted in 169 patients with predominantly low-grade glioma.ResultsCorrelations between the subjective and the 2 objective cognitive indicators were negligible (0.04) to low (0.24). Objective cognitive deficits were predominantly associated with sociodemographic (older age, lower education, male sex) and clinical (left hemisphere tumor) variables, while lower ratings of subjective cognitive function were more closely related to self-reported mental health symptoms (fatigue, lower mental well-being), physical (motor) dysfunction and female sex. Self-reported communication deficits were associated significantly with both subjective and objective dysfunction.ConclusionsWe recommend that both subjective and objective measures of cognitive functioning, together with a measure of psychological distress, be used for comprehensive neuropsychological assessments of patients with glioma to determine which areas are most affected and which specific intervention strategies are most appropriate.

Journal

Neuro-Oncology PracticeOxford University Press

Published: Mar 3, 2015

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