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Quantifying Threats to Imperiled Species in the United States

Quantifying Threats to Imperiled Species in the United States Quantifying Threats to Imperiled Species in the United States Assessing the relative importance of habitat destruction, alien species, pollution, overexploitation, and disease David S. Wilcove, David Rothstein, Jason Dubow, Ali Phillips, and Elizabeth Losos iologists are nearly unanimous fine-scale analysis of the types of in their belief that humanity is habitat destruction affecting US Habitat loss is the Bin the process of extirpating a plants and animals protected under significant portion of the earth's spe­ the federal Endangered Species Act single greatest threat cies. The ways in which we are doing (ESA). We also speculate on how so reflect the magnitude and scale of these threats have changed over time to biodiversity, followed human enterprise. Everything from and are likely to change in the future. highway construction to cattle ranch­ We conclude with a brief discussion by the spread of ing to leaky bait buckets has been of the implications of our findings alien species implicated in the demise or endan­ for the long-term protection of im­ germent of particular species. Ac­ periled species in the United States. cording to Wilson (1992), most of these activities fall into four major passed by them-is responsible for An overview of the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png BioScience Oxford University Press

Quantifying Threats to Imperiled Species in the United States

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References (33)

Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© 1998 by the American Institute of Biological Sciences
ISSN
0006-3568
eISSN
1525-3244
DOI
10.2307/1313420
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Quantifying Threats to Imperiled Species in the United States Assessing the relative importance of habitat destruction, alien species, pollution, overexploitation, and disease David S. Wilcove, David Rothstein, Jason Dubow, Ali Phillips, and Elizabeth Losos iologists are nearly unanimous fine-scale analysis of the types of in their belief that humanity is habitat destruction affecting US Habitat loss is the Bin the process of extirpating a plants and animals protected under significant portion of the earth's spe­ the federal Endangered Species Act single greatest threat cies. The ways in which we are doing (ESA). We also speculate on how so reflect the magnitude and scale of these threats have changed over time to biodiversity, followed human enterprise. Everything from and are likely to change in the future. highway construction to cattle ranch­ We conclude with a brief discussion by the spread of ing to leaky bait buckets has been of the implications of our findings alien species implicated in the demise or endan­ for the long-term protection of im­ germent of particular species. Ac­ periled species in the United States. cording to Wilson (1992), most of these activities fall into four major passed by them-is responsible for An overview of the

Journal

BioScienceOxford University Press

Published: Aug 1, 1998

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