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Racial/Ethnic Differences in Responses to the Everyday Discrimination Scale: A Differential Item Functioning Analysis

Racial/Ethnic Differences in Responses to the Everyday Discrimination Scale: A Differential Item... The authors examined the impact of race/ethnicity on responses to the Everyday Discrimination Scale, one of the most widely used discrimination scales in epidemiologic and public health research. Participants were 3,295 middle-aged US women (African-American, Caucasian, Chinese, Hispanic, and Japanese) from the Study of Womens Health Across the Nation (SWAN) baseline examination (19961997). Multiple-indicator, multiple-cause models were used to examine differential item functioning (DIF) on the Everyday Discrimination Scale by race/ethnicity. After adjustment for age, education, and language of interview, meaningful DIF was observed for 3 (out of 10) items: receiving poorer service in restaurants or stores, being treated as if you are dishonest, and being treated with less courtesy than other people (all P's < 0.001). Consequently, the profile of everyday discrimination differed slightly for women of different racial/ethnic groups, with certain public experiences appearing to have more salience for African-American and Chinese women and dishonesty having more salience for racial/ethnic minority women overall. Courtesy appeared to have more salience for Hispanic women only in comparison with African-American women. Findings suggest that the Everyday Discrimination Scale could potentially be used across racial/ethnic groups as originally intended. However, researchers should use caution with items that demonstrated DIF. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Epidemiology Oxford University Press

Racial/Ethnic Differences in Responses to the Everyday Discrimination Scale: A Differential Item Functioning Analysis

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References (68)

Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
American Journal of Epidemiology The Author 2012. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
ISSN
0002-9262
eISSN
1476-6256
DOI
10.1093/aje/kwr287
pmid
22306556
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The authors examined the impact of race/ethnicity on responses to the Everyday Discrimination Scale, one of the most widely used discrimination scales in epidemiologic and public health research. Participants were 3,295 middle-aged US women (African-American, Caucasian, Chinese, Hispanic, and Japanese) from the Study of Womens Health Across the Nation (SWAN) baseline examination (19961997). Multiple-indicator, multiple-cause models were used to examine differential item functioning (DIF) on the Everyday Discrimination Scale by race/ethnicity. After adjustment for age, education, and language of interview, meaningful DIF was observed for 3 (out of 10) items: receiving poorer service in restaurants or stores, being treated as if you are dishonest, and being treated with less courtesy than other people (all P's < 0.001). Consequently, the profile of everyday discrimination differed slightly for women of different racial/ethnic groups, with certain public experiences appearing to have more salience for African-American and Chinese women and dishonesty having more salience for racial/ethnic minority women overall. Courtesy appeared to have more salience for Hispanic women only in comparison with African-American women. Findings suggest that the Everyday Discrimination Scale could potentially be used across racial/ethnic groups as originally intended. However, researchers should use caution with items that demonstrated DIF.

Journal

American Journal of EpidemiologyOxford University Press

Published: Mar 1, 2012

Keywords: African Americans Asian Americans bias (epidemiology) European continental ancestry group Hispanic Americans prejudice psychometrics questionnaires

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