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THE COLUMBIA CRISIS: CAMPUS, VIETNAM, AND THE GHETTO

THE COLUMBIA CRISIS: CAMPUS, VIETNAM, AND THE GHETTO Abstract A survey of student and faculty attitudes and behavior at Columbia University following widespread demonstrations and disorders in the Spring of 1968 found that students and faculty divided in roughly equal proportions on the major issues. Only a small minority favored the sit-in tactics of the demonstrators, but majorities favored some of their major stated goals. Police action that ended the sit-ins slightly increased acceptance of the demonstrators' tactics, but did not change attitudes on issues very much. Attitudes toward the crisis were strongly related to over-all satisfaction with the University and to attitudes toward the ghetto and the Vietnam war. This content is only available as a PDF. © 1968, the American Association for Public Opinion Research http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Public Opinion Quarterly Oxford University Press

THE COLUMBIA CRISIS: CAMPUS, VIETNAM, AND THE GHETTO

Public Opinion Quarterly , Volume 32 (3) – Jan 1, 1968

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© 1968, the American Association for Public Opinion Research
ISSN
0033-362X
eISSN
1537-5331
DOI
10.1086/267619
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract A survey of student and faculty attitudes and behavior at Columbia University following widespread demonstrations and disorders in the Spring of 1968 found that students and faculty divided in roughly equal proportions on the major issues. Only a small minority favored the sit-in tactics of the demonstrators, but majorities favored some of their major stated goals. Police action that ended the sit-ins slightly increased acceptance of the demonstrators' tactics, but did not change attitudes on issues very much. Attitudes toward the crisis were strongly related to over-all satisfaction with the University and to attitudes toward the ghetto and the Vietnam war. This content is only available as a PDF. © 1968, the American Association for Public Opinion Research

Journal

Public Opinion QuarterlyOxford University Press

Published: Jan 1, 1968

There are no references for this article.