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The Impact of Accessible Identities on the Evaluation of Global versus Local Products

The Impact of Accessible Identities on the Evaluation of Global versus Local Products Through three studies, we investigated the impact of consumers' global versus local identities on the evaluation of global products (products with the same specifications and packaging for consumers from around the world) versus local products (products with specifications and packaging tailored for local markets). The results show that consumers with an accessible global identity prefer a global (more than a local) product and consumers with an accessible local identity prefer a local (more than a global) product. Of note, this effect was reversed, either by an explicit instruction about accessible identities being nondiagnostic (study 1) or implicitly by inducing a differentiative (vs. integrative) processing mode (study 2). http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Consumer Research Oxford University Press

The Impact of Accessible Identities on the Evaluation of Global versus Local Products

Journal of Consumer Research , Volume 36 (3): 14 – Oct 1, 2009

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References (47)

Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© 2009 by JOURNAL OF CONSUMER RESEARCH, Inc.
ISSN
0093-5301
eISSN
1537-5277
DOI
10.1086/598794
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Through three studies, we investigated the impact of consumers' global versus local identities on the evaluation of global products (products with the same specifications and packaging for consumers from around the world) versus local products (products with specifications and packaging tailored for local markets). The results show that consumers with an accessible global identity prefer a global (more than a local) product and consumers with an accessible local identity prefer a local (more than a global) product. Of note, this effect was reversed, either by an explicit instruction about accessible identities being nondiagnostic (study 1) or implicitly by inducing a differentiative (vs. integrative) processing mode (study 2).

Journal

Journal of Consumer ResearchOxford University Press

Published: Oct 1, 2009

Keywords: Self-Concept; Assimilation/Contrast; Experimental Design and Analysis (ANOVA)

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