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The New Age Movement: The Celebration of the Self and the Sacralization of Modernity, by Paul Heelas. Cambridge: Blackwell, 1996, 266 pp. $49.95

The New Age Movement: The Celebration of the Self and the Sacralization of Modernity, by Paul... BOOK REVlEWS 97 and analyzes the condensing symbols and The Ne~u Age Mo~emem is an ambitious rituals which produce more detailed moral work in some respects. Paul Heelas has logics for protest. Although Jasper continually compiled extensive archival materials on new hints at the quasi-religious nature of protest, age groups and provides many interesting the parallels become overt as his discussion of minutiae about altemative religious beliefs ritual, pilgrimage, and sacred space explicitly and teachings. If that is primarily what one identifies the mimicking of religious rituals by expects to find here, I can recommend it. post-industrial movements such as the anti- Beyond that, however, I find the work nuclear protests at Diablo Canyon. The disappointing on several fronts. For imlxuzance of intemal movement culture and sociologists in particular, the volume fails to moral articulation is also extended into a inchde a large body of social science research discussion of the choice of tactics and on new religious movements. The funda- organizational forros. mental flaw derives from the author's position Jasper concludes with a normative read at the outset that the new age movement is of social movements. While the transition is neither a "new religion" ora "movement." abrupt, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Sociology of Religion: A Quarterly Review Oxford University Press

The New Age Movement: The Celebration of the Self and the Sacralization of Modernity, by Paul Heelas. Cambridge: Blackwell, 1996, 266 pp. $49.95

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© Published by Oxford University Press.
ISSN
1069-4404
eISSN
1759-8818
DOI
10.2307/3711817
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

BOOK REVlEWS 97 and analyzes the condensing symbols and The Ne~u Age Mo~emem is an ambitious rituals which produce more detailed moral work in some respects. Paul Heelas has logics for protest. Although Jasper continually compiled extensive archival materials on new hints at the quasi-religious nature of protest, age groups and provides many interesting the parallels become overt as his discussion of minutiae about altemative religious beliefs ritual, pilgrimage, and sacred space explicitly and teachings. If that is primarily what one identifies the mimicking of religious rituals by expects to find here, I can recommend it. post-industrial movements such as the anti- Beyond that, however, I find the work nuclear protests at Diablo Canyon. The disappointing on several fronts. For imlxuzance of intemal movement culture and sociologists in particular, the volume fails to moral articulation is also extended into a inchde a large body of social science research discussion of the choice of tactics and on new religious movements. The funda- organizational forros. mental flaw derives from the author's position Jasper concludes with a normative read at the outset that the new age movement is of social movements. While the transition is neither a "new religion" ora "movement." abrupt,

Journal

Sociology of Religion: A Quarterly ReviewOxford University Press

Published: Jan 1, 1999

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