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The pathology of sponge orange band disease affecting the Caribbean barrel sponge Xestospongia muta

The pathology of sponge orange band disease affecting the Caribbean barrel sponge Xestospongia muta AbstractThe aim of this study was to examine sponge orange band (SOB) disease affecting the prominent Caribbean sponge Xestospongia muta. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy revealed that SOB is accompanied by the massive destruction of the pinacoderm. Chlorophyll a content and the main secondary metabolites, tetrahydrofurans, characteristic of X. muta, were significantly lower in bleached than in healthy tissues. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis using cyanobacteria-specific 16S rRNA gene primers revealed a distinct shift from the Synechococcus/Prochlorococcus clade of sponge symbionts towards several clades of unspecific cyanobacteria, including lineages associated with coral disease (i.e. Leptolyngbya sp.). Underwater infection experiments were conducted by transplanting bleached cores into healthy individuals, but revealed no signs of SOB development. This study provided no evidence for the involvement of a specific microbial pathogen as an etiologic agent of disease; hence, the cause of SOB disease in X. muta remains unidentified. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png FEMS Microbiology Ecology Oxford University Press

The pathology of sponge orange band disease affecting the Caribbean barrel sponge Xestospongia muta

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References (61)

Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© 2010 Federation of European Microbiological Societies Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0168-6496
eISSN
1574-6941
DOI
10.1111/j.1574-6941.2010.01001.x
pmid
21118276
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractThe aim of this study was to examine sponge orange band (SOB) disease affecting the prominent Caribbean sponge Xestospongia muta. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy revealed that SOB is accompanied by the massive destruction of the pinacoderm. Chlorophyll a content and the main secondary metabolites, tetrahydrofurans, characteristic of X. muta, were significantly lower in bleached than in healthy tissues. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis using cyanobacteria-specific 16S rRNA gene primers revealed a distinct shift from the Synechococcus/Prochlorococcus clade of sponge symbionts towards several clades of unspecific cyanobacteria, including lineages associated with coral disease (i.e. Leptolyngbya sp.). Underwater infection experiments were conducted by transplanting bleached cores into healthy individuals, but revealed no signs of SOB development. This study provided no evidence for the involvement of a specific microbial pathogen as an etiologic agent of disease; hence, the cause of SOB disease in X. muta remains unidentified.

Journal

FEMS Microbiology EcologyOxford University Press

Published: Feb 9, 2011

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