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The Strategy of Social Protest, by William A. Gamson

The Strategy of Social Protest, by William A. Gamson 544 I POLITICAL SCIENCE QUARTERLY fact that blacks are residentially more segregated than formerly, even if better housed, should somehow be viewed as a negative factor. This prointegration bias emerges intermittently throughout the book and consequently flaws the analysis, but because it is explicitly stated the reader can make allowances for it. The status of marriage and the family was viewed as having exhibited serious deterioration during the period under study and the authors do not hide their concern for what this trend may presage. A final section summarizes the findings and asks if the dream can be realized. Here the book is most disappointing—-perhaps inevitably so. To their credit, the authors project a fairly gloomy outlook in terms of the general mood of the society as regards a repetition of the admittedly inadequate experiment of the 1960s. They might have been even more pessimistic than they were, for their projections were couched primarily in sociopolitical terms. But the economic realities, which are likely to prove a formidable hindrance to future rapid in­ crease in the United States GNP, are likely to be even more intractable obstacles to black progress than is the political mood of the nation. Black http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Political Science Quarterly Oxford University Press

The Strategy of Social Protest, by William A. Gamson

Political Science Quarterly , Volume 90 (3): 3 – Sep 15, 1975

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Copyright
1975 The Academy of Political Science
ISSN
0032-3195
eISSN
1538-165X
DOI
10.2307/2148303
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

544 I POLITICAL SCIENCE QUARTERLY fact that blacks are residentially more segregated than formerly, even if better housed, should somehow be viewed as a negative factor. This prointegration bias emerges intermittently throughout the book and consequently flaws the analysis, but because it is explicitly stated the reader can make allowances for it. The status of marriage and the family was viewed as having exhibited serious deterioration during the period under study and the authors do not hide their concern for what this trend may presage. A final section summarizes the findings and asks if the dream can be realized. Here the book is most disappointing—-perhaps inevitably so. To their credit, the authors project a fairly gloomy outlook in terms of the general mood of the society as regards a repetition of the admittedly inadequate experiment of the 1960s. They might have been even more pessimistic than they were, for their projections were couched primarily in sociopolitical terms. But the economic realities, which are likely to prove a formidable hindrance to future rapid in­ crease in the United States GNP, are likely to be even more intractable obstacles to black progress than is the political mood of the nation. Black

Journal

Political Science QuarterlyOxford University Press

Published: Sep 15, 1975

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