Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Subscribe now for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

A biopsychosocial model of the development of chronic conduct problems in adolescence.

A biopsychosocial model of the development of chronic conduct problems in adolescence. A biopsychosocial model of the development of adolescent chronic conduct problems is presented and supported through a review of empirical findings. This model posits that biological dispositions and sociocultural contexts place certain children at risk in early life but that life experiences with parents, peers. and social institutions increment and mediate this risk. A transactional developmental model is best equipped to describe the emergence of chronic antisocial behavior across time. Reciprocal influences among dispositions, contexts, and life experiences lead to recursive iterations across time that exacerbate or diminish antisocial development. Cognitive and emotional processes within the child, including the acquisition of knowledge and social-information-processing patterns, mediate the relation between life experiences and conduct problem outcomes. Implications for prevention research and public policy are noted. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Developmental Psychology Pubmed

A biopsychosocial model of the development of chronic conduct problems in adolescence.

Developmental Psychology , Volume 39 (2): 23 – Jun 17, 2003

A biopsychosocial model of the development of chronic conduct problems in adolescence.


Abstract

A biopsychosocial model of the development of adolescent chronic conduct problems is presented and supported through a review of empirical findings. This model posits that biological dispositions and sociocultural contexts place certain children at risk in early life but that life experiences with parents, peers. and social institutions increment and mediate this risk. A transactional developmental model is best equipped to describe the emergence of chronic antisocial behavior across time. Reciprocal influences among dispositions, contexts, and life experiences lead to recursive iterations across time that exacerbate or diminish antisocial development. Cognitive and emotional processes within the child, including the acquisition of knowledge and social-information-processing patterns, mediate the relation between life experiences and conduct problem outcomes. Implications for prevention research and public policy are noted.

Loading next page...
 
/lp/pubmed/a-biopsychosocial-model-of-the-development-of-chronic-conduct-problems-qmlm3ukNY3

References (321)

ISSN
0012-1649
DOI
10.1037//0012-1649.39.2.349
pmid
12661890
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A biopsychosocial model of the development of adolescent chronic conduct problems is presented and supported through a review of empirical findings. This model posits that biological dispositions and sociocultural contexts place certain children at risk in early life but that life experiences with parents, peers. and social institutions increment and mediate this risk. A transactional developmental model is best equipped to describe the emergence of chronic antisocial behavior across time. Reciprocal influences among dispositions, contexts, and life experiences lead to recursive iterations across time that exacerbate or diminish antisocial development. Cognitive and emotional processes within the child, including the acquisition of knowledge and social-information-processing patterns, mediate the relation between life experiences and conduct problem outcomes. Implications for prevention research and public policy are noted.

Journal

Developmental PsychologyPubmed

Published: Jun 17, 2003

There are no references for this article.