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Additivity of the effects of retention interval and context change on latent inhibition: toward resolution of the context forgetting paradox.

Additivity of the effects of retention interval and context change on latent inhibition: toward... Three experiments with rats examined retention interval and context switch effects factorially in the latent inhibition paradigm. In Experiment 1, a 28-day retention interval abolished a context switch effect on latent inhibition. In Experiment 2, re-exposure to the contexts before conditioning re-established the context switch effect at the 28-day interval. In this case, the retention interval and context switch effects were additive: Latent inhibition was weakest when the retention interval and context switch were combined. Experiment 3 replicated the context switch effect at the 28-day interval. The results suggest that context switch and retention interval effects may be based on the same process. Context switch effects may weaken over time because physical contexts are embedded in superordinate temporal contexts; animals fail to retrieve physical context when the temporal context changes. This view helps resolve a paradox that has been noted for contextual change theories of forgetting. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of experimental psychology. Animal behavior processes Pubmed

Additivity of the effects of retention interval and context change on latent inhibition: toward resolution of the context forgetting paradox.

Journal of experimental psychology. Animal behavior processes , Volume 23 (3): 12 – Aug 12, 1997

Additivity of the effects of retention interval and context change on latent inhibition: toward resolution of the context forgetting paradox.


Abstract

Three experiments with rats examined retention interval and context switch effects factorially in the latent inhibition paradigm. In Experiment 1, a 28-day retention interval abolished a context switch effect on latent inhibition. In Experiment 2, re-exposure to the contexts before conditioning re-established the context switch effect at the 28-day interval. In this case, the retention interval and context switch effects were additive: Latent inhibition was weakest when the retention interval and context switch were combined. Experiment 3 replicated the context switch effect at the 28-day interval. The results suggest that context switch and retention interval effects may be based on the same process. Context switch effects may weaken over time because physical contexts are embedded in superordinate temporal contexts; animals fail to retrieve physical context when the temporal context changes. This view helps resolve a paradox that has been noted for contextual change theories of forgetting.

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ISSN
0097-7403
DOI
10.1037//0097-7403.23.3.283
pmid
9206025

Abstract

Three experiments with rats examined retention interval and context switch effects factorially in the latent inhibition paradigm. In Experiment 1, a 28-day retention interval abolished a context switch effect on latent inhibition. In Experiment 2, re-exposure to the contexts before conditioning re-established the context switch effect at the 28-day interval. In this case, the retention interval and context switch effects were additive: Latent inhibition was weakest when the retention interval and context switch were combined. Experiment 3 replicated the context switch effect at the 28-day interval. The results suggest that context switch and retention interval effects may be based on the same process. Context switch effects may weaken over time because physical contexts are embedded in superordinate temporal contexts; animals fail to retrieve physical context when the temporal context changes. This view helps resolve a paradox that has been noted for contextual change theories of forgetting.

Journal

Journal of experimental psychology. Animal behavior processesPubmed

Published: Aug 12, 1997

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