Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Addressing cancer survivorship through public health: an update from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Addressing cancer survivorship through public health: an update from the Centers for Disease... Currently, there are nearly 12 million cancer survivors living in the United States. They face a myriad of personal and health issues related to their cancer treatment. Increased recognition of cancer survivorship as a distinct and important phase that follows the diagnosis and treatment of cancer has contributed to the development of public health-related strategies and plans to address those strategies. CDC's Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (DCPC) uses an interdisciplinary public health approach to address the needs of cancer survivors through applied research, public health surveillance and data collection, education, and health promotion, especially among underserved populations that may be at risk for health disparities. Our surveillance activities contribute to population-based descriptions of the health and treatment experiences of cancer survivors in the United States. These data inform applied research activities as well as provide baseline data on cancer survivors for local comprehensive cancer control programs. The knowledge gained by our research efforts informs the development of interventions, awareness and education campaigns, and other outreach activities targeting cancer survivors and those who care for and support them. Our partnerships with national organizations, state health agencies, and other key groups are essential in the development, implementation, and promotion of effective cancer control practices related to cancer survivorship. This article provides an overview of the cancer survivorship activities currently being implemented by DCPC. We highlight several public health surveillance, research, and programmatic outreach and partnership activities currently underway. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of women's health (2002) Pubmed

Addressing cancer survivorship through public health: an update from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Journal of women's health (2002) , Volume 18 (10): -1493 – Jan 22, 2010

Addressing cancer survivorship through public health: an update from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.


Abstract

Currently, there are nearly 12 million cancer survivors living in the United States. They face a myriad of personal and health issues related to their cancer treatment. Increased recognition of cancer survivorship as a distinct and important phase that follows the diagnosis and treatment of cancer has contributed to the development of public health-related strategies and plans to address those strategies. CDC's Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (DCPC) uses an interdisciplinary public health approach to address the needs of cancer survivors through applied research, public health surveillance and data collection, education, and health promotion, especially among underserved populations that may be at risk for health disparities. Our surveillance activities contribute to population-based descriptions of the health and treatment experiences of cancer survivors in the United States. These data inform applied research activities as well as provide baseline data on cancer survivors for local comprehensive cancer control programs. The knowledge gained by our research efforts informs the development of interventions, awareness and education campaigns, and other outreach activities targeting cancer survivors and those who care for and support them. Our partnerships with national organizations, state health agencies, and other key groups are essential in the development, implementation, and promotion of effective cancer control practices related to cancer survivorship. This article provides an overview of the cancer survivorship activities currently being implemented by DCPC. We highlight several public health surveillance, research, and programmatic outreach and partnership activities currently underway.

Loading next page...
 
/lp/pubmed/addressing-cancer-survivorship-through-public-health-an-update-from-W0eSgnNyOP

References

References for this paper are not available at this time. We will be adding them shortly, thank you for your patience.

DOI
10.1089/jwh.2009.1666
pmid
19788367

Abstract

Currently, there are nearly 12 million cancer survivors living in the United States. They face a myriad of personal and health issues related to their cancer treatment. Increased recognition of cancer survivorship as a distinct and important phase that follows the diagnosis and treatment of cancer has contributed to the development of public health-related strategies and plans to address those strategies. CDC's Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (DCPC) uses an interdisciplinary public health approach to address the needs of cancer survivors through applied research, public health surveillance and data collection, education, and health promotion, especially among underserved populations that may be at risk for health disparities. Our surveillance activities contribute to population-based descriptions of the health and treatment experiences of cancer survivors in the United States. These data inform applied research activities as well as provide baseline data on cancer survivors for local comprehensive cancer control programs. The knowledge gained by our research efforts informs the development of interventions, awareness and education campaigns, and other outreach activities targeting cancer survivors and those who care for and support them. Our partnerships with national organizations, state health agencies, and other key groups are essential in the development, implementation, and promotion of effective cancer control practices related to cancer survivorship. This article provides an overview of the cancer survivorship activities currently being implemented by DCPC. We highlight several public health surveillance, research, and programmatic outreach and partnership activities currently underway.

Journal

Journal of women's health (2002)Pubmed

Published: Jan 22, 2010

There are no references for this article.