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Adhesion measured on the attachment pads of Tettigonia viridissima (Orthoptera, insecta).

Adhesion measured on the attachment pads of Tettigonia viridissima (Orthoptera, insecta). The tarsi of the cricket Tettigonia viridissima bear flexible attachment pads that are able to deform, replicating the profile of a surface to which they are apposed. This attachment system is supplemented by a secretion produced by epidermal cells and transported onto the surface of the pad through the pore canals of the pad cuticle. This study shows that the secretion alone is necessary, but not sufficient, for adhesion. To account for the full adhesive force, the deformation of the pad and the resulting changes in contact area were considered. In two series of experiments, the adhesive properties of the secretion and the adhesion of the whole pad were measured using a force tester, the sensitivity of which ranged from micronewtons to centinewtons. The adhesive forces of the secretion measured between a smooth sapphire ball with a diameter of 1.47 mm and a flat silicon surface ranged from 0.1 to 0.6 mN. In a control experiment on the silicon surface without secretion, no adhesive force was measured. There was no dependence of the adhesive force on the applied compressive force. When an intact pad was pulled off a flat silicon surface, the adhesive force increased with increasing applied compressive force, but it did not increase further once the applied force exceeded a certain value. The saturated adhesive force, ranging from 0.7 to 1.2 mN, was obtained at applied forces of 0.7-1.5 mN. The hemispherical surface of the pad had a larger contact area and demonstrated greater adhesion under a larger applied force. Adhesion became saturated when a pad was deformed such that contact area was maximal. The tenacity (the adhesive force per unit area) was 1.7-2.2 mN mm(-)(2). http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of experimental biology Pubmed

Adhesion measured on the attachment pads of Tettigonia viridissima (Orthoptera, insecta).

The Journal of experimental biology , Volume 203 (Pt 12): -1791 – Aug 11, 2000

Adhesion measured on the attachment pads of Tettigonia viridissima (Orthoptera, insecta).


Abstract

The tarsi of the cricket Tettigonia viridissima bear flexible attachment pads that are able to deform, replicating the profile of a surface to which they are apposed. This attachment system is supplemented by a secretion produced by epidermal cells and transported onto the surface of the pad through the pore canals of the pad cuticle. This study shows that the secretion alone is necessary, but not sufficient, for adhesion. To account for the full adhesive force, the deformation of the pad and the resulting changes in contact area were considered. In two series of experiments, the adhesive properties of the secretion and the adhesion of the whole pad were measured using a force tester, the sensitivity of which ranged from micronewtons to centinewtons. The adhesive forces of the secretion measured between a smooth sapphire ball with a diameter of 1.47 mm and a flat silicon surface ranged from 0.1 to 0.6 mN. In a control experiment on the silicon surface without secretion, no adhesive force was measured. There was no dependence of the adhesive force on the applied compressive force. When an intact pad was pulled off a flat silicon surface, the adhesive force increased with increasing applied compressive force, but it did not increase further once the applied force exceeded a certain value. The saturated adhesive force, ranging from 0.7 to 1.2 mN, was obtained at applied forces of 0.7-1.5 mN. The hemispherical surface of the pad had a larger contact area and demonstrated greater adhesion under a larger applied force. Adhesion became saturated when a pad was deformed such that contact area was maximal. The tenacity (the adhesive force per unit area) was 1.7-2.2 mN mm(-)(2).

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ISSN
0022-0949
DOI
10.1242/jeb.203.12.1887
pmid
10821745

Abstract

The tarsi of the cricket Tettigonia viridissima bear flexible attachment pads that are able to deform, replicating the profile of a surface to which they are apposed. This attachment system is supplemented by a secretion produced by epidermal cells and transported onto the surface of the pad through the pore canals of the pad cuticle. This study shows that the secretion alone is necessary, but not sufficient, for adhesion. To account for the full adhesive force, the deformation of the pad and the resulting changes in contact area were considered. In two series of experiments, the adhesive properties of the secretion and the adhesion of the whole pad were measured using a force tester, the sensitivity of which ranged from micronewtons to centinewtons. The adhesive forces of the secretion measured between a smooth sapphire ball with a diameter of 1.47 mm and a flat silicon surface ranged from 0.1 to 0.6 mN. In a control experiment on the silicon surface without secretion, no adhesive force was measured. There was no dependence of the adhesive force on the applied compressive force. When an intact pad was pulled off a flat silicon surface, the adhesive force increased with increasing applied compressive force, but it did not increase further once the applied force exceeded a certain value. The saturated adhesive force, ranging from 0.7 to 1.2 mN, was obtained at applied forces of 0.7-1.5 mN. The hemispherical surface of the pad had a larger contact area and demonstrated greater adhesion under a larger applied force. Adhesion became saturated when a pad was deformed such that contact area was maximal. The tenacity (the adhesive force per unit area) was 1.7-2.2 mN mm(-)(2).

Journal

The Journal of experimental biologyPubmed

Published: Aug 11, 2000

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