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Adolescents who take overdoses: their characteristics, problems and contacts with helping agencies.

Adolescents who take overdoses: their characteristics, problems and contacts with helping agencies. In a consecutive sample of 50 adolescents aged 13-18 admitted to hospital after taking overdoses, 90 per cent were girls. There were other clear differences between this sample and adolescents in general. Twenty-four per cent had visited their general practitioners in the previous week, and 50 per cent during the previous month. The most common difficulties preceding the overdoses were problems with parents, boys or girlfriends, and with school or work, including unemployment. A substantial proportion of the subjects had recent recurrent physical ill health. In the majority of cases the problems appeared to be transient so that one month later two-thirds of the adolescents had shown considerable general improvement. However, 14 per cent were referred to hospital for further self-poisoning or self-injury in the following year. The recent increase in the incidence of self-poisoning among adolescents suggests that more attention must be paid to this group in terms of both primary and secondary prevention. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The British journal of psychiatry : the journal of mental science Pubmed

Adolescents who take overdoses: their characteristics, problems and contacts with helping agencies.

The British journal of psychiatry : the journal of mental science , Volume 140: 6 – Jul 8, 1982

Adolescents who take overdoses: their characteristics, problems and contacts with helping agencies.


Abstract

In a consecutive sample of 50 adolescents aged 13-18 admitted to hospital after taking overdoses, 90 per cent were girls. There were other clear differences between this sample and adolescents in general. Twenty-four per cent had visited their general practitioners in the previous week, and 50 per cent during the previous month. The most common difficulties preceding the overdoses were problems with parents, boys or girlfriends, and with school or work, including unemployment. A substantial proportion of the subjects had recent recurrent physical ill health. In the majority of cases the problems appeared to be transient so that one month later two-thirds of the adolescents had shown considerable general improvement. However, 14 per cent were referred to hospital for further self-poisoning or self-injury in the following year. The recent increase in the incidence of self-poisoning among adolescents suggests that more attention must be paid to this group in terms of both primary and secondary prevention.

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ISSN
0007-1250
DOI
10.1192/bjp.140.2.118
pmid
7074292

Abstract

In a consecutive sample of 50 adolescents aged 13-18 admitted to hospital after taking overdoses, 90 per cent were girls. There were other clear differences between this sample and adolescents in general. Twenty-four per cent had visited their general practitioners in the previous week, and 50 per cent during the previous month. The most common difficulties preceding the overdoses were problems with parents, boys or girlfriends, and with school or work, including unemployment. A substantial proportion of the subjects had recent recurrent physical ill health. In the majority of cases the problems appeared to be transient so that one month later two-thirds of the adolescents had shown considerable general improvement. However, 14 per cent were referred to hospital for further self-poisoning or self-injury in the following year. The recent increase in the incidence of self-poisoning among adolescents suggests that more attention must be paid to this group in terms of both primary and secondary prevention.

Journal

The British journal of psychiatry : the journal of mental sciencePubmed

Published: Jul 8, 1982

There are no references for this article.