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Air contamination during hip and knee arthroplasties. Horizontal laminar flow randomized vs. conventional ventilation.

Air contamination during hip and knee arthroplasties. Horizontal laminar flow randomized vs.... In a randomized study 90 patients, operated on with a total hip or knee arthroplasty, were allocated to 1 of 3 different regimes, all including a reinforced single-use operating gown: (1) horizontal laminar flow ventilation and conventional clothes (cotton shirts and trousers) for all staff members, (2) horizontal laminar flow ventilation and occlusive garments (Klinidress) and (3) conventional ventilation and occlusive garments. Volumetric air sampling gave a low mean number of colony-forming units (< 10 cfu/m3) in the vicinity of the wound in all 3 groups. Laminar ventilation, with or without occlusive staff garments, resulted in less air contamination compared to conventional ventilation. During knee arthroplasty, the use of occlusive clothes in the laminar ventilation room, further reduced the number of airborne, bacteria-carrying particles to around 1 cfu/m3. No such reduction was seen during hip arthroplasty. We conclude that hip and knee arthroplasties can be performed in operating theaters with conventional ventilation when occlusive staff garments are used. However, laminar air flow ventilation in knee surgery, preferably in combination with occlusive garments, resulted in a substantially lower air contamination and should be preferred. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Acta orthopaedica Scandinavica Pubmed

Air contamination during hip and knee arthroplasties. Horizontal laminar flow randomized vs. conventional ventilation.

Acta orthopaedica Scandinavica , Volume 66 (1): 4 – Mar 23, 1995

Air contamination during hip and knee arthroplasties. Horizontal laminar flow randomized vs. conventional ventilation.


Abstract

In a randomized study 90 patients, operated on with a total hip or knee arthroplasty, were allocated to 1 of 3 different regimes, all including a reinforced single-use operating gown: (1) horizontal laminar flow ventilation and conventional clothes (cotton shirts and trousers) for all staff members, (2) horizontal laminar flow ventilation and occlusive garments (Klinidress) and (3) conventional ventilation and occlusive garments. Volumetric air sampling gave a low mean number of colony-forming units (< 10 cfu/m3) in the vicinity of the wound in all 3 groups. Laminar ventilation, with or without occlusive staff garments, resulted in less air contamination compared to conventional ventilation. During knee arthroplasty, the use of occlusive clothes in the laminar ventilation room, further reduced the number of airborne, bacteria-carrying particles to around 1 cfu/m3. No such reduction was seen during hip arthroplasty. We conclude that hip and knee arthroplasties can be performed in operating theaters with conventional ventilation when occlusive staff garments are used. However, laminar air flow ventilation in knee surgery, preferably in combination with occlusive garments, resulted in a substantially lower air contamination and should be preferred.

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ISSN
0001-6470
DOI
10.3109/17453679508994632
pmid
7863761

Abstract

In a randomized study 90 patients, operated on with a total hip or knee arthroplasty, were allocated to 1 of 3 different regimes, all including a reinforced single-use operating gown: (1) horizontal laminar flow ventilation and conventional clothes (cotton shirts and trousers) for all staff members, (2) horizontal laminar flow ventilation and occlusive garments (Klinidress) and (3) conventional ventilation and occlusive garments. Volumetric air sampling gave a low mean number of colony-forming units (< 10 cfu/m3) in the vicinity of the wound in all 3 groups. Laminar ventilation, with or without occlusive staff garments, resulted in less air contamination compared to conventional ventilation. During knee arthroplasty, the use of occlusive clothes in the laminar ventilation room, further reduced the number of airborne, bacteria-carrying particles to around 1 cfu/m3. No such reduction was seen during hip arthroplasty. We conclude that hip and knee arthroplasties can be performed in operating theaters with conventional ventilation when occlusive staff garments are used. However, laminar air flow ventilation in knee surgery, preferably in combination with occlusive garments, resulted in a substantially lower air contamination and should be preferred.

Journal

Acta orthopaedica ScandinavicaPubmed

Published: Mar 23, 1995

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