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Allogeneic stem-cell transplantation with reduced conditioning intensity as a novel immunotherapy and antiviral therapy for adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma.

Allogeneic stem-cell transplantation with reduced conditioning intensity as a novel immunotherapy... Sixteen patients with adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) who were all over 50 years of age underwent allogeneic stem cell transplantation with reduced-conditioning intensity (RIST) from HLA-matched sibling donors after a conditioning regimen consisting of fludarabine (180 mg/m2), busulfan (8 mg/kg), and rabbit antithymocyte globulin (5 mg/kg). The observed regimen-related toxicities and nonhematologic toxicities were all found to be acceptable. Disease relapse was the main cause of treatment failure. Three patients who had a relapse subsequently responded to a rapid discontinuation of the immunosuppressive agent and thereafter achieved another remission. After RIST, the human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) proviral load became undetectable in 8 patients. RIST is thus considered to be a feasible treatment for ATL. Our data also suggest the presence of a possible graft-versus-ATL effect; an anti-HTLV-1 activity was also found to be associated with this procedure. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Blood Pubmed

Allogeneic stem-cell transplantation with reduced conditioning intensity as a novel immunotherapy and antiviral therapy for adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma.

Allogeneic stem-cell transplantation with reduced conditioning intensity as a novel immunotherapy and antiviral therapy for adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma.


Abstract

Sixteen patients with adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) who were all over 50 years of age underwent allogeneic stem cell transplantation with reduced-conditioning intensity (RIST) from HLA-matched sibling donors after a conditioning regimen consisting of fludarabine (180 mg/m2), busulfan (8 mg/kg), and rabbit antithymocyte globulin (5 mg/kg). The observed regimen-related toxicities and nonhematologic toxicities were all found to be acceptable. Disease relapse was the main cause of treatment failure. Three patients who had a relapse subsequently responded to a rapid discontinuation of the immunosuppressive agent and thereafter achieved another remission. After RIST, the human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) proviral load became undetectable in 8 patients. RIST is thus considered to be a feasible treatment for ATL. Our data also suggest the presence of a possible graft-versus-ATL effect; an anti-HTLV-1 activity was also found to be associated with this procedure.

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ISSN
0006-4971
DOI
10.1182/blood-2004-11-4193
pmid
15665110

Abstract

Sixteen patients with adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) who were all over 50 years of age underwent allogeneic stem cell transplantation with reduced-conditioning intensity (RIST) from HLA-matched sibling donors after a conditioning regimen consisting of fludarabine (180 mg/m2), busulfan (8 mg/kg), and rabbit antithymocyte globulin (5 mg/kg). The observed regimen-related toxicities and nonhematologic toxicities were all found to be acceptable. Disease relapse was the main cause of treatment failure. Three patients who had a relapse subsequently responded to a rapid discontinuation of the immunosuppressive agent and thereafter achieved another remission. After RIST, the human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) proviral load became undetectable in 8 patients. RIST is thus considered to be a feasible treatment for ATL. Our data also suggest the presence of a possible graft-versus-ATL effect; an anti-HTLV-1 activity was also found to be associated with this procedure.

Journal

BloodPubmed

Published: Jun 7, 2005

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