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Androgen Receptor Structure, Function and Biology: From Bench to Bedside.

Androgen Receptor Structure, Function and Biology: From Bench to Bedside. The actions of androgens such as testosterone and dihydrotestosterone are mediated via the androgen receptor (AR), a ligand-dependent nuclear transcription factor and member of the steroid hormone nuclear receptor family. Given its widespread expression in many cells and tissues, the AR has a diverse range of biological actions including important roles in the development and maintenance of the reproductive, musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, immune, neural and haemopoietic systems. AR signalling may also be involved in the development of tumours in the prostate, bladder, liver, kidney and lung. Androgens can exert their actions via the AR in a DNA binding-dependent manner to regulate target gene transcription, or in a non-DNA binding-dependent manner to initiate rapid, cellular events such as the phosphorylation of 2(nd) messenger signalling cascades. More recently, ligand-independent actions of the AR have also been identified. Given the large volume of studies relating to androgens and the AR, this review is not intended as an extensive review of all studies investigating the AR, but rather as an overview of the structure, function, signalling pathways and biology of the AR as well as its important role in clinical medicine, with emphasis on recent developments in this field. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Clinical biochemist. Reviews Pubmed

Androgen Receptor Structure, Function and Biology: From Bench to Bedside.

The Clinical biochemist. Reviews , Volume 37 (1): 13 – Apr 8, 2016

Androgen Receptor Structure, Function and Biology: From Bench to Bedside.


Abstract

The actions of androgens such as testosterone and dihydrotestosterone are mediated via the androgen receptor (AR), a ligand-dependent nuclear transcription factor and member of the steroid hormone nuclear receptor family. Given its widespread expression in many cells and tissues, the AR has a diverse range of biological actions including important roles in the development and maintenance of the reproductive, musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, immune, neural and haemopoietic systems. AR signalling may also be involved in the development of tumours in the prostate, bladder, liver, kidney and lung. Androgens can exert their actions via the AR in a DNA binding-dependent manner to regulate target gene transcription, or in a non-DNA binding-dependent manner to initiate rapid, cellular events such as the phosphorylation of 2(nd) messenger signalling cascades. More recently, ligand-independent actions of the AR have also been identified. Given the large volume of studies relating to androgens and the AR, this review is not intended as an extensive review of all studies investigating the AR, but rather as an overview of the structure, function, signalling pathways and biology of the AR as well as its important role in clinical medicine, with emphasis on recent developments in this field.

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ISSN
0159-8090
pmid
27057074

Abstract

The actions of androgens such as testosterone and dihydrotestosterone are mediated via the androgen receptor (AR), a ligand-dependent nuclear transcription factor and member of the steroid hormone nuclear receptor family. Given its widespread expression in many cells and tissues, the AR has a diverse range of biological actions including important roles in the development and maintenance of the reproductive, musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, immune, neural and haemopoietic systems. AR signalling may also be involved in the development of tumours in the prostate, bladder, liver, kidney and lung. Androgens can exert their actions via the AR in a DNA binding-dependent manner to regulate target gene transcription, or in a non-DNA binding-dependent manner to initiate rapid, cellular events such as the phosphorylation of 2(nd) messenger signalling cascades. More recently, ligand-independent actions of the AR have also been identified. Given the large volume of studies relating to androgens and the AR, this review is not intended as an extensive review of all studies investigating the AR, but rather as an overview of the structure, function, signalling pathways and biology of the AR as well as its important role in clinical medicine, with emphasis on recent developments in this field.

Journal

The Clinical biochemist. ReviewsPubmed

Published: Apr 8, 2016

There are no references for this article.