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Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder--from brain dysfunctions to behaviour.

Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder--from brain dysfunctions to behaviour. This special issue represents an attempt to answer fundamental brain and behaviour issues in attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The European network on hyperkinetic disorders (Eunethydis) is trying to develop a novel, testable theory of ADHD, giving an account of its causes, its development from brain dysfunctions to behavioural symptoms and co-morbidity and explaining why no current therapy produces long-lasting improvements. The combined insights of the articles presented here suggest that there is no brain damage in ADHD, but hypo-efficient dopamine systems which give rise to neurochemical imbalances. These cause behavioural problems: deficits in sustained attention, overactivity and impulsiveness. Impulsiveness is increasingly being seen as a key characteristic of the disorder. None of these symptoms are necessarily primary, but may be secondary to an underlying deficit in reinforcement processes seen particularly in a greater than normal sensitivity to variations in the timing of stimulus presentation. Other symptoms can also be seen: altered effects of reinforcers, increased behavioural variance and motor co-ordination problems. Medication produces temporary, plastic changes in cellular components like receptors and transduction mechanisms normalising dopamine functions and behaviour. reserved. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Behavioural brain research Pubmed

Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder--from brain dysfunctions to behaviour.

Behavioural brain research , Volume 94 (1): 10 – Nov 12, 1998

Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder--from brain dysfunctions to behaviour.


Abstract

This special issue represents an attempt to answer fundamental brain and behaviour issues in attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The European network on hyperkinetic disorders (Eunethydis) is trying to develop a novel, testable theory of ADHD, giving an account of its causes, its development from brain dysfunctions to behavioural symptoms and co-morbidity and explaining why no current therapy produces long-lasting improvements. The combined insights of the articles presented here suggest that there is no brain damage in ADHD, but hypo-efficient dopamine systems which give rise to neurochemical imbalances. These cause behavioural problems: deficits in sustained attention, overactivity and impulsiveness. Impulsiveness is increasingly being seen as a key characteristic of the disorder. None of these symptoms are necessarily primary, but may be secondary to an underlying deficit in reinforcement processes seen particularly in a greater than normal sensitivity to variations in the timing of stimulus presentation. Other symptoms can also be seen: altered effects of reinforcers, increased behavioural variance and motor co-ordination problems. Medication produces temporary, plastic changes in cellular components like receptors and transduction mechanisms normalising dopamine functions and behaviour. reserved.

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ISSN
0166-4328
pmid
9708834

Abstract

This special issue represents an attempt to answer fundamental brain and behaviour issues in attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The European network on hyperkinetic disorders (Eunethydis) is trying to develop a novel, testable theory of ADHD, giving an account of its causes, its development from brain dysfunctions to behavioural symptoms and co-morbidity and explaining why no current therapy produces long-lasting improvements. The combined insights of the articles presented here suggest that there is no brain damage in ADHD, but hypo-efficient dopamine systems which give rise to neurochemical imbalances. These cause behavioural problems: deficits in sustained attention, overactivity and impulsiveness. Impulsiveness is increasingly being seen as a key characteristic of the disorder. None of these symptoms are necessarily primary, but may be secondary to an underlying deficit in reinforcement processes seen particularly in a greater than normal sensitivity to variations in the timing of stimulus presentation. Other symptoms can also be seen: altered effects of reinforcers, increased behavioural variance and motor co-ordination problems. Medication produces temporary, plastic changes in cellular components like receptors and transduction mechanisms normalising dopamine functions and behaviour. reserved.

Journal

Behavioural brain researchPubmed

Published: Nov 12, 1998

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