Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Blood pressure rise following angiogenesis inhibition by bevacizumab. A crucial role for microcirculation.

Blood pressure rise following angiogenesis inhibition by bevacizumab. A crucial role for... Arterial hypertension (HT) has been reported in all studies involving bevacizumab, an antiangiogenic agent designed to target vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The mechanism underlying bevacizumab-related HT is not yet clearly understood. As far as endothelial dysfunction and microvascular rarefaction are hallmarks in all forms of HT, we tested the hypothesis that anti-VEGF therapy could alter the microcirculation in nontumor tissues and, thus, result in an increase in blood pressure (BP). We used intravital video microscopy to measure dermal capillary densities in the dorsum of the fingers. Microvascular endothelial function was assessed by laser Doppler flowmetry combined with iontophoresis of pilocarpine (acetylcholine analogue). All measurements were carried out in 18 patients before and after a 6-month treatment with bevacizumab (mean cumulative dose: 3.16 +/- 0.90 g). Mean BP was increased after 6 months of therapy compared with baseline, from 129 +/- 13/75 +/- 7 mmHg to 145 +/- 17/82 +/- 7 mmHg for systolic BP and diastolic BP, respectively (P < 0.0001). Compared with the baseline, mean dermal capillary density at 6 months was significantly lower (75 +/- 12 versus 83 +/- 13/mm(2); P < 0.0001), as well as pilocarpine-induced vasodilation (P < 0.05). Thus, bevacizumab treatment resulted in endothelial dysfunction and capillary rarefaction; both changes are closely associated and could be responsible for the rise in BP observed in most patients. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annals of Oncology Pubmed

Blood pressure rise following angiogenesis inhibition by bevacizumab. A crucial role for microcirculation.

Annals of Oncology , Volume 19 (5): 8 – Jun 24, 2008

Blood pressure rise following angiogenesis inhibition by bevacizumab. A crucial role for microcirculation.


Abstract

Arterial hypertension (HT) has been reported in all studies involving bevacizumab, an antiangiogenic agent designed to target vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The mechanism underlying bevacizumab-related HT is not yet clearly understood. As far as endothelial dysfunction and microvascular rarefaction are hallmarks in all forms of HT, we tested the hypothesis that anti-VEGF therapy could alter the microcirculation in nontumor tissues and, thus, result in an increase in blood pressure (BP). We used intravital video microscopy to measure dermal capillary densities in the dorsum of the fingers. Microvascular endothelial function was assessed by laser Doppler flowmetry combined with iontophoresis of pilocarpine (acetylcholine analogue). All measurements were carried out in 18 patients before and after a 6-month treatment with bevacizumab (mean cumulative dose: 3.16 +/- 0.90 g). Mean BP was increased after 6 months of therapy compared with baseline, from 129 +/- 13/75 +/- 7 mmHg to 145 +/- 17/82 +/- 7 mmHg for systolic BP and diastolic BP, respectively (P < 0.0001). Compared with the baseline, mean dermal capillary density at 6 months was significantly lower (75 +/- 12 versus 83 +/- 13/mm(2); P < 0.0001), as well as pilocarpine-induced vasodilation (P < 0.05). Thus, bevacizumab treatment resulted in endothelial dysfunction and capillary rarefaction; both changes are closely associated and could be responsible for the rise in BP observed in most patients.

Loading next page...
 
/lp/pubmed/blood-pressure-rise-following-angiogenesis-inhibition-by-bevacizumab-a-MfhxYJcKph

References (56)

ISSN
0923-7534
DOI
10.1093/annonc/mdm550
pmid
18056916
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Arterial hypertension (HT) has been reported in all studies involving bevacizumab, an antiangiogenic agent designed to target vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The mechanism underlying bevacizumab-related HT is not yet clearly understood. As far as endothelial dysfunction and microvascular rarefaction are hallmarks in all forms of HT, we tested the hypothesis that anti-VEGF therapy could alter the microcirculation in nontumor tissues and, thus, result in an increase in blood pressure (BP). We used intravital video microscopy to measure dermal capillary densities in the dorsum of the fingers. Microvascular endothelial function was assessed by laser Doppler flowmetry combined with iontophoresis of pilocarpine (acetylcholine analogue). All measurements were carried out in 18 patients before and after a 6-month treatment with bevacizumab (mean cumulative dose: 3.16 +/- 0.90 g). Mean BP was increased after 6 months of therapy compared with baseline, from 129 +/- 13/75 +/- 7 mmHg to 145 +/- 17/82 +/- 7 mmHg for systolic BP and diastolic BP, respectively (P < 0.0001). Compared with the baseline, mean dermal capillary density at 6 months was significantly lower (75 +/- 12 versus 83 +/- 13/mm(2); P < 0.0001), as well as pilocarpine-induced vasodilation (P < 0.05). Thus, bevacizumab treatment resulted in endothelial dysfunction and capillary rarefaction; both changes are closely associated and could be responsible for the rise in BP observed in most patients.

Journal

Annals of OncologyPubmed

Published: Jun 24, 2008

There are no references for this article.