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CLEARANCE OF BACTERIA BY THE LOWER RESPIRATORY TRACT.

CLEARANCE OF BACTERIA BY THE LOWER RESPIRATORY TRACT. The disappearance of inhaled bacteria from the lungs of mice is rapid and predictable over an 8-hour period following pulmonary implantation by an aerosol. This indicates that important clearance mechanisms are active in the bronchopulmonary tree. The constant pattern of clearance offers an experimental system in which the effects of various conditions relevant to respiratory infection can be estimated quantitatively. Herein, the effects of hypoxia, alcohol, cigarette smoke, and cortisone are described. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Science (New York, N.Y.) Pubmed

CLEARANCE OF BACTERIA BY THE LOWER RESPIRATORY TRACT.

Science (New York, N.Y.) , Volume 142 (3599): -1568 – Dec 1, 1996

CLEARANCE OF BACTERIA BY THE LOWER RESPIRATORY TRACT.


Abstract

The disappearance of inhaled bacteria from the lungs of mice is rapid and predictable over an 8-hour period following pulmonary implantation by an aerosol. This indicates that important clearance mechanisms are active in the bronchopulmonary tree. The constant pattern of clearance offers an experimental system in which the effects of various conditions relevant to respiratory infection can be estimated quantitatively. Herein, the effects of hypoxia, alcohol, cigarette smoke, and cortisone are described.

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ISSN
0036-8075
DOI
10.1126/science.142.3599.1572
pmid
14075687

Abstract

The disappearance of inhaled bacteria from the lungs of mice is rapid and predictable over an 8-hour period following pulmonary implantation by an aerosol. This indicates that important clearance mechanisms are active in the bronchopulmonary tree. The constant pattern of clearance offers an experimental system in which the effects of various conditions relevant to respiratory infection can be estimated quantitatively. Herein, the effects of hypoxia, alcohol, cigarette smoke, and cortisone are described.

Journal

Science (New York, N.Y.)Pubmed

Published: Dec 1, 1996

There are no references for this article.