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Composition of grape skin proanthocyanidins at different stages of berry development.

Composition of grape skin proanthocyanidins at different stages of berry development. The composition of grape (Vitis vinifera L. cv. Shiraz) skin proanthocyanidins has been determined at different stages of berry development. Beginning approximately 3 weeks after fruit set and concluding at commercial ripeness, the composition of isolated skin proanthocyanidins was determined using the following analytical techniques: elemental analysis, UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy, reversed-phase HPLC after acid-catalysis in the presence of excess phloroglucinol, gel permeation chromatography, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), and (13)C NMR. On the basis of these analyses, berry development was correlated with an increase in proanthocyanidin mean degree of polymerization, an increase in the proportion of (-)-epigallocatechin extension subunits, and increases in the level of anthocyanins associated with the proanthocyanidin fraction. Additionally, data acquired from ESI-MS of the isolates following acid-catalysis in the presence of excess phloroglucinol is consistent with pectin-bound proanthocyanidins. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry Pubmed

Composition of grape skin proanthocyanidins at different stages of berry development.

Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry , Volume 49 (11): -5292 – Jan 14, 2002

Composition of grape skin proanthocyanidins at different stages of berry development.


Abstract

The composition of grape (Vitis vinifera L. cv. Shiraz) skin proanthocyanidins has been determined at different stages of berry development. Beginning approximately 3 weeks after fruit set and concluding at commercial ripeness, the composition of isolated skin proanthocyanidins was determined using the following analytical techniques: elemental analysis, UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy, reversed-phase HPLC after acid-catalysis in the presence of excess phloroglucinol, gel permeation chromatography, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), and (13)C NMR. On the basis of these analyses, berry development was correlated with an increase in proanthocyanidin mean degree of polymerization, an increase in the proportion of (-)-epigallocatechin extension subunits, and increases in the level of anthocyanins associated with the proanthocyanidin fraction. Additionally, data acquired from ESI-MS of the isolates following acid-catalysis in the presence of excess phloroglucinol is consistent with pectin-bound proanthocyanidins.

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ISSN
0021-8561
DOI
10.1021/jf010758h
pmid
11714327

Abstract

The composition of grape (Vitis vinifera L. cv. Shiraz) skin proanthocyanidins has been determined at different stages of berry development. Beginning approximately 3 weeks after fruit set and concluding at commercial ripeness, the composition of isolated skin proanthocyanidins was determined using the following analytical techniques: elemental analysis, UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy, reversed-phase HPLC after acid-catalysis in the presence of excess phloroglucinol, gel permeation chromatography, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), and (13)C NMR. On the basis of these analyses, berry development was correlated with an increase in proanthocyanidin mean degree of polymerization, an increase in the proportion of (-)-epigallocatechin extension subunits, and increases in the level of anthocyanins associated with the proanthocyanidin fraction. Additionally, data acquired from ESI-MS of the isolates following acid-catalysis in the presence of excess phloroglucinol is consistent with pectin-bound proanthocyanidins.

Journal

Journal of Agricultural and Food ChemistryPubmed

Published: Jan 14, 2002

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