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Cryptococcal meningitis after liver transplantation.

Cryptococcal meningitis after liver transplantation. We present our experience with 10 liver transplant recipients in whom cryptococcal meningitis developed after liver transplantation. Disease developed a median period of 3.5 months (range, 2-36 months) after transplantation and patients were diagnosed a median period of 9 days (range, 2-90 days) after initial symptoms. Headache, fever, and mental status changes were the most frequent clinical presentations, while meningismus was found in only 30% of patients. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis was diagnostic in all cases. All patients were treated with amphotericin B and flucytosine. Immunosuppression was either decreased or discontinued during therapy. Five patients died, four as a direct result of cryptococcal infection and one as a result of chronic rejection. Three patients had long-term survival without any sequelae. One long-term survivor suffered blindness consequent to the disease. We conclude that cryptococcal meningitis is a rare complication in liver transplant recipients (0.25%), and has a high mortality rate (50%). Early recognition, combination antifungal therapy, and decrease or discontinuation of immunosuppression are important for cure. No relapse has been seen in surviving patients. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Transplantation Pubmed

Cryptococcal meningitis after liver transplantation.

Transplantation , Volume 61 (1): -136 – Feb 27, 1996

Cryptococcal meningitis after liver transplantation.


Abstract

We present our experience with 10 liver transplant recipients in whom cryptococcal meningitis developed after liver transplantation. Disease developed a median period of 3.5 months (range, 2-36 months) after transplantation and patients were diagnosed a median period of 9 days (range, 2-90 days) after initial symptoms. Headache, fever, and mental status changes were the most frequent clinical presentations, while meningismus was found in only 30% of patients. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis was diagnostic in all cases. All patients were treated with amphotericin B and flucytosine. Immunosuppression was either decreased or discontinued during therapy. Five patients died, four as a direct result of cryptococcal infection and one as a result of chronic rejection. Three patients had long-term survival without any sequelae. One long-term survivor suffered blindness consequent to the disease. We conclude that cryptococcal meningitis is a rare complication in liver transplant recipients (0.25%), and has a high mortality rate (50%). Early recognition, combination antifungal therapy, and decrease or discontinuation of immunosuppression are important for cure. No relapse has been seen in surviving patients.

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ISSN
0041-1337
DOI
10.1097/00007890-199601150-00027
pmid
8560554

Abstract

We present our experience with 10 liver transplant recipients in whom cryptococcal meningitis developed after liver transplantation. Disease developed a median period of 3.5 months (range, 2-36 months) after transplantation and patients were diagnosed a median period of 9 days (range, 2-90 days) after initial symptoms. Headache, fever, and mental status changes were the most frequent clinical presentations, while meningismus was found in only 30% of patients. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis was diagnostic in all cases. All patients were treated with amphotericin B and flucytosine. Immunosuppression was either decreased or discontinued during therapy. Five patients died, four as a direct result of cryptococcal infection and one as a result of chronic rejection. Three patients had long-term survival without any sequelae. One long-term survivor suffered blindness consequent to the disease. We conclude that cryptococcal meningitis is a rare complication in liver transplant recipients (0.25%), and has a high mortality rate (50%). Early recognition, combination antifungal therapy, and decrease or discontinuation of immunosuppression are important for cure. No relapse has been seen in surviving patients.

Journal

TransplantationPubmed

Published: Feb 27, 1996

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