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Diagnosis and management of atypical Mycobacterium spp. infections in established laboratory zebrafish (Brachydanio rerio) facilities.

Diagnosis and management of atypical Mycobacterium spp. infections in established laboratory... Two established zebrafish colonies experienced increased mortality and decreased reproductive performance. Initial examination of several fish from one facility revealed hyperemic gills, petechia around the opercula, abdominal distention, and emaciation. Affected fish had congested liver with inflammation and multifocal hepatic necrosis. Large numbers of acid-fast-positive, rod-shaped bacteria were evident in multiple tissues and the blood. Mycobacterium fortuitum was subsequently isolated from several fish. Zebrafish from the second facility had skin erosions and ulceration along the flank just caudal to the pectoral fins. Large numbers of acid-fast-positive, rod-shaped bacteria were observed within the necrotic centers of well-demarcated, multifocal granulomas in gonads, liver, and peritoneum from affected fish. Mycobacterium abscessus and M. chelonae were isolated and identified biochemically. Definitive diagnosis in these outbreaks was obtained by culture on selective media. Because Mycobacterium spp. grow extremely slowly and positive confirmation may require 45 to 60 days, Mycobacterium species-specific polymerase chain reaction analysis was used to provide a rapid screening assay for Mycobacterium spp. as well as for verification of culture results. To our knowledge, this is the first documentation of mycobacterial infection in laboratory-maintained zebrafish and provides guidelines for diagnosis, management, and prevention of atypical mycobacteriosis in laboratory zebrafish colonies. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Comparative medicine Pubmed

Diagnosis and management of atypical Mycobacterium spp. infections in established laboratory zebrafish (Brachydanio rerio) facilities.

Comparative medicine , Volume 50 (6): 7 – Apr 12, 2001

Diagnosis and management of atypical Mycobacterium spp. infections in established laboratory zebrafish (Brachydanio rerio) facilities.


Abstract

Two established zebrafish colonies experienced increased mortality and decreased reproductive performance. Initial examination of several fish from one facility revealed hyperemic gills, petechia around the opercula, abdominal distention, and emaciation. Affected fish had congested liver with inflammation and multifocal hepatic necrosis. Large numbers of acid-fast-positive, rod-shaped bacteria were evident in multiple tissues and the blood. Mycobacterium fortuitum was subsequently isolated from several fish. Zebrafish from the second facility had skin erosions and ulceration along the flank just caudal to the pectoral fins. Large numbers of acid-fast-positive, rod-shaped bacteria were observed within the necrotic centers of well-demarcated, multifocal granulomas in gonads, liver, and peritoneum from affected fish. Mycobacterium abscessus and M. chelonae were isolated and identified biochemically. Definitive diagnosis in these outbreaks was obtained by culture on selective media. Because Mycobacterium spp. grow extremely slowly and positive confirmation may require 45 to 60 days, Mycobacterium species-specific polymerase chain reaction analysis was used to provide a rapid screening assay for Mycobacterium spp. as well as for verification of culture results. To our knowledge, this is the first documentation of mycobacterial infection in laboratory-maintained zebrafish and provides guidelines for diagnosis, management, and prevention of atypical mycobacteriosis in laboratory zebrafish colonies.

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ISSN
1532-0820
pmid
11200575

Abstract

Two established zebrafish colonies experienced increased mortality and decreased reproductive performance. Initial examination of several fish from one facility revealed hyperemic gills, petechia around the opercula, abdominal distention, and emaciation. Affected fish had congested liver with inflammation and multifocal hepatic necrosis. Large numbers of acid-fast-positive, rod-shaped bacteria were evident in multiple tissues and the blood. Mycobacterium fortuitum was subsequently isolated from several fish. Zebrafish from the second facility had skin erosions and ulceration along the flank just caudal to the pectoral fins. Large numbers of acid-fast-positive, rod-shaped bacteria were observed within the necrotic centers of well-demarcated, multifocal granulomas in gonads, liver, and peritoneum from affected fish. Mycobacterium abscessus and M. chelonae were isolated and identified biochemically. Definitive diagnosis in these outbreaks was obtained by culture on selective media. Because Mycobacterium spp. grow extremely slowly and positive confirmation may require 45 to 60 days, Mycobacterium species-specific polymerase chain reaction analysis was used to provide a rapid screening assay for Mycobacterium spp. as well as for verification of culture results. To our knowledge, this is the first documentation of mycobacterial infection in laboratory-maintained zebrafish and provides guidelines for diagnosis, management, and prevention of atypical mycobacteriosis in laboratory zebrafish colonies.

Journal

Comparative medicinePubmed

Published: Apr 12, 2001

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