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Direct Visualization and Manipulation of Stacking Orders in Few-Layer Graphene by Dynamic Atomic Force Microscopy.

Direct Visualization and Manipulation of Stacking Orders in Few-Layer Graphene by Dynamic Atomic... Stacking order plays a central role in governing a wide range of properties in layered two-dimensional materials. In the case of few-layer graphene, there are two common stacking configurations: ABA and ABC stacking, which have been proven to exhibit dramatically different electronic properties. However, the controllable characterization and manipulation between them remain a great challenge. Here, we report that ABA- and ABC-stacked domains can be directly visualized in phase imaging by tapping-mode atomic force microscopy with much higher spatial resolution than conventional optical spectroscopy. The contrasting phase is caused by the different energy dissipation by the tip-sample interaction. We further demonstrate controllable manipulation on the ABA/ABC domain walls by means of propagating stress transverse waves generated by the tapping of tip. Our results offer a reliable strategy for direct imaging and precise control of the atomic structures in few-layer graphene, which can be extended to other two-dimensional materials. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters Pubmed

Direct Visualization and Manipulation of Stacking Orders in Few-Layer Graphene by Dynamic Atomic Force Microscopy.

The Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters , Volume 12 (30): 7 – Aug 5, 2021

Direct Visualization and Manipulation of Stacking Orders in Few-Layer Graphene by Dynamic Atomic Force Microscopy.


Abstract

Stacking order plays a central role in governing a wide range of properties in layered two-dimensional materials. In the case of few-layer graphene, there are two common stacking configurations: ABA and ABC stacking, which have been proven to exhibit dramatically different electronic properties. However, the controllable characterization and manipulation between them remain a great challenge. Here, we report that ABA- and ABC-stacked domains can be directly visualized in phase imaging by tapping-mode atomic force microscopy with much higher spatial resolution than conventional optical spectroscopy. The contrasting phase is caused by the different energy dissipation by the tip-sample interaction. We further demonstrate controllable manipulation on the ABA/ABC domain walls by means of propagating stress transverse waves generated by the tapping of tip. Our results offer a reliable strategy for direct imaging and precise control of the atomic structures in few-layer graphene, which can be extended to other two-dimensional materials.

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eISSN
1948-7185
DOI
10.1021/acs.jpclett.1c01579
pmid
34319748

Abstract

Stacking order plays a central role in governing a wide range of properties in layered two-dimensional materials. In the case of few-layer graphene, there are two common stacking configurations: ABA and ABC stacking, which have been proven to exhibit dramatically different electronic properties. However, the controllable characterization and manipulation between them remain a great challenge. Here, we report that ABA- and ABC-stacked domains can be directly visualized in phase imaging by tapping-mode atomic force microscopy with much higher spatial resolution than conventional optical spectroscopy. The contrasting phase is caused by the different energy dissipation by the tip-sample interaction. We further demonstrate controllable manipulation on the ABA/ABC domain walls by means of propagating stress transverse waves generated by the tapping of tip. Our results offer a reliable strategy for direct imaging and precise control of the atomic structures in few-layer graphene, which can be extended to other two-dimensional materials.

Journal

The Journal of Physical Chemistry LettersPubmed

Published: Aug 5, 2021

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