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Discretely Supported Dry Adhesive Film Inspired by Biological Bending Behavior for Enhanced Performance on a Rough Surface.

Discretely Supported Dry Adhesive Film Inspired by Biological Bending Behavior for Enhanced... Biologically inspired dry adhesion has recently become a research hot topic because of its practical significance in scientific research and instrumental technology. Yet, most of the current studies merely focus on borrowing the concept from some finer biological contact elements but lose sight of the foundation ones that play an equally important role in the adhesion functionality. Inspired by the bending behavior of the flexible foundation element of a gecko (lamellar skin) in attachment motion, in this study, a new type of dry adhesive structure was proposed, wherein a mushroom-shaped micropillar array behaving as a strongly adhesive layer was engineered on a discretely supported thin film. We experimentally observed and analytically modeled the structural deformation and found that the energy penalty could be largely reduced because of the partial shift from pillar bending to film bending. Such behavior is very analogous in functionality to the lamellar skin in a gecko's pads and is helpful in effectively limiting the damage of the contact interface, thus generating enhanced adhesion even on a rough surface. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces Pubmed

Discretely Supported Dry Adhesive Film Inspired by Biological Bending Behavior for Enhanced Performance on a Rough Surface.

ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces , Volume 9 (8): 9 – Jul 30, 2018

Discretely Supported Dry Adhesive Film Inspired by Biological Bending Behavior for Enhanced Performance on a Rough Surface.


Abstract

Biologically inspired dry adhesion has recently become a research hot topic because of its practical significance in scientific research and instrumental technology. Yet, most of the current studies merely focus on borrowing the concept from some finer biological contact elements but lose sight of the foundation ones that play an equally important role in the adhesion functionality. Inspired by the bending behavior of the flexible foundation element of a gecko (lamellar skin) in attachment motion, in this study, a new type of dry adhesive structure was proposed, wherein a mushroom-shaped micropillar array behaving as a strongly adhesive layer was engineered on a discretely supported thin film. We experimentally observed and analytically modeled the structural deformation and found that the energy penalty could be largely reduced because of the partial shift from pillar bending to film bending. Such behavior is very analogous in functionality to the lamellar skin in a gecko's pads and is helpful in effectively limiting the damage of the contact interface, thus generating enhanced adhesion even on a rough surface.

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ISSN
1944-8244
DOI
10.1021/acsami.6b14951
pmid
28186403

Abstract

Biologically inspired dry adhesion has recently become a research hot topic because of its practical significance in scientific research and instrumental technology. Yet, most of the current studies merely focus on borrowing the concept from some finer biological contact elements but lose sight of the foundation ones that play an equally important role in the adhesion functionality. Inspired by the bending behavior of the flexible foundation element of a gecko (lamellar skin) in attachment motion, in this study, a new type of dry adhesive structure was proposed, wherein a mushroom-shaped micropillar array behaving as a strongly adhesive layer was engineered on a discretely supported thin film. We experimentally observed and analytically modeled the structural deformation and found that the energy penalty could be largely reduced because of the partial shift from pillar bending to film bending. Such behavior is very analogous in functionality to the lamellar skin in a gecko's pads and is helpful in effectively limiting the damage of the contact interface, thus generating enhanced adhesion even on a rough surface.

Journal

ACS Applied Materials & InterfacesPubmed

Published: Jul 30, 2018

References