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Enhancement of intestinal growth in neonatal rats by epidermal growth factor in milk.

Enhancement of intestinal growth in neonatal rats by epidermal growth factor in milk. Breast milk has been shown to enhance neonatal intestinal growth. Because epidermal growth factor (EGF) is present in the milk of various mammalian species, the hypothesis was tested that EGF in rodent milk mediates, in part, the breast milk-enhanced intestinal growth in neonatal rat. Fifty-eight rat pups fed artificial formula that contained 1.2, 3.0, and 6.0 micrograms/ml EGF for 39 h had greater incorporation of [3H]thymidine into DNA and DNA content of intestine than 29 pups fed unsupplemented formula. Pups fed EGF for 5 days had significantly greater body weight, intestinal weight, length, and DNA content than control pups. Conversely, pups fed pooled rat milk containing rabbit-derived antibody to EGF for 39 h had intestines of lower weight that contained less DNA than animals fed rat milk containing normal rabbit serum. EGF appears to mediate in part, breast milk-enhanced neonatal intestinal growth. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The American journal of physiology Pubmed

Enhancement of intestinal growth in neonatal rats by epidermal growth factor in milk.

The American journal of physiology , Volume 253 (5 Pt 1): -656 – Jan 6, 1988

Enhancement of intestinal growth in neonatal rats by epidermal growth factor in milk.


Abstract

Breast milk has been shown to enhance neonatal intestinal growth. Because epidermal growth factor (EGF) is present in the milk of various mammalian species, the hypothesis was tested that EGF in rodent milk mediates, in part, the breast milk-enhanced intestinal growth in neonatal rat. Fifty-eight rat pups fed artificial formula that contained 1.2, 3.0, and 6.0 micrograms/ml EGF for 39 h had greater incorporation of [3H]thymidine into DNA and DNA content of intestine than 29 pups fed unsupplemented formula. Pups fed EGF for 5 days had significantly greater body weight, intestinal weight, length, and DNA content than control pups. Conversely, pups fed pooled rat milk containing rabbit-derived antibody to EGF for 39 h had intestines of lower weight that contained less DNA than animals fed rat milk containing normal rabbit serum. EGF appears to mediate in part, breast milk-enhanced neonatal intestinal growth.

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ISSN
0002-9513
DOI
10.1152/ajpgi.1987.253.5.G662
pmid
3500649

Abstract

Breast milk has been shown to enhance neonatal intestinal growth. Because epidermal growth factor (EGF) is present in the milk of various mammalian species, the hypothesis was tested that EGF in rodent milk mediates, in part, the breast milk-enhanced intestinal growth in neonatal rat. Fifty-eight rat pups fed artificial formula that contained 1.2, 3.0, and 6.0 micrograms/ml EGF for 39 h had greater incorporation of [3H]thymidine into DNA and DNA content of intestine than 29 pups fed unsupplemented formula. Pups fed EGF for 5 days had significantly greater body weight, intestinal weight, length, and DNA content than control pups. Conversely, pups fed pooled rat milk containing rabbit-derived antibody to EGF for 39 h had intestines of lower weight that contained less DNA than animals fed rat milk containing normal rabbit serum. EGF appears to mediate in part, breast milk-enhanced neonatal intestinal growth.

Journal

The American journal of physiologyPubmed

Published: Jan 6, 1988

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