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Environmental DNA bioassays corroborate field data for detection of overwintering species at risk Blanding's turtles (Emydoidea blandingii).

Environmental DNA bioassays corroborate field data for detection of overwintering species at risk... Environmental DNA (eDNA) is gaining traction in conservation ecology as a powerful tool for detecting species at risk. We developed a quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay to detect a DNA amplicon fragment of the mitochondrial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide locus of the Blanding's turtle (Emydoidea blandingii) for detecting overwintering individuals. Seventy-eight water samples were collected from 17 wetland sites in Ontario, Canada. We used traditional field data to identify a priori positive and negative control sites. Fifty percent of positive control sites amplified. Detection was related to the number of individuals estimated from field observations in at least one region surveyed. Positive control sites had lower total dissolved solids and electrical conductivity in relation to negative control sites. Shedding rates were within the same order of magnitude for brumating and active turtles. We recommend collecting additional samples at a larger number of locations to maximize detection. Recommended sampling design changes may overshadow the additional effects of water chemistry and low eDNA shedding rates. eDNA offers tremendous potential to practitioners conducting species at risk assessments in environmental consulting by providing a faster, more efficient method of detection compared with traditional surveys. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Genome Pubmed

Environmental DNA bioassays corroborate field data for detection of overwintering species at risk Blanding's turtles (Emydoidea blandingii).

Environmental DNA bioassays corroborate field data for detection of overwintering species at risk Blanding's turtles (Emydoidea blandingii).


Abstract

Environmental DNA (eDNA) is gaining traction in conservation ecology as a powerful tool for detecting species at risk. We developed a quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay to detect a DNA amplicon fragment of the mitochondrial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide locus of the Blanding's turtle (Emydoidea blandingii) for detecting overwintering individuals. Seventy-eight water samples were collected from 17 wetland sites in Ontario, Canada. We used traditional field data to identify a priori positive and negative control sites. Fifty percent of positive control sites amplified. Detection was related to the number of individuals estimated from field observations in at least one region surveyed. Positive control sites had lower total dissolved solids and electrical conductivity in relation to negative control sites. Shedding rates were within the same order of magnitude for brumating and active turtles. We recommend collecting additional samples at a larger number of locations to maximize detection. Recommended sampling design changes may overshadow the additional effects of water chemistry and low eDNA shedding rates. eDNA offers tremendous potential to practitioners conducting species at risk assessments in environmental consulting by providing a faster, more efficient method of detection compared with traditional surveys.

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ISSN
0831-2796
eISSN
1480-3321
DOI
10.1139/gen-2020-0043
pmid
33538216

Abstract

Environmental DNA (eDNA) is gaining traction in conservation ecology as a powerful tool for detecting species at risk. We developed a quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay to detect a DNA amplicon fragment of the mitochondrial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide locus of the Blanding's turtle (Emydoidea blandingii) for detecting overwintering individuals. Seventy-eight water samples were collected from 17 wetland sites in Ontario, Canada. We used traditional field data to identify a priori positive and negative control sites. Fifty percent of positive control sites amplified. Detection was related to the number of individuals estimated from field observations in at least one region surveyed. Positive control sites had lower total dissolved solids and electrical conductivity in relation to negative control sites. Shedding rates were within the same order of magnitude for brumating and active turtles. We recommend collecting additional samples at a larger number of locations to maximize detection. Recommended sampling design changes may overshadow the additional effects of water chemistry and low eDNA shedding rates. eDNA offers tremendous potential to practitioners conducting species at risk assessments in environmental consulting by providing a faster, more efficient method of detection compared with traditional surveys.

Journal

GenomePubmed

Published: Sep 20, 2021

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