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Full-body exercise training improves fitness and quality of life in survivors of breast cancer.

Full-body exercise training improves fitness and quality of life in survivors of breast cancer. This study evaluated the safety and effectiveness of an 8-week full-body resistance and aerobic exercise program for 27 survivors of breast cancer (age, 57.7 +/- 7.2 years; years posttreatment, 0.8- 21.0) with prior upper-body conditioning. Physical fitness and quality-of-life (QOL) measures were obtained before and after the training period. Lymphedema, evaluated via arm volume measurement at baseline, was self-monitored throughout the trial. Sum of skinfolds, waist girth, and hip girth were significantly reduced posttraining (p < 0.01), although body weight did not change. Significant improvements (p < 0.01) were observed in upper-body strength (35.6 +/- 16.4%) and endurance (167.4 +/- 55.4%), lower-body strength (50.7 +/- 32.3%) and endurance (273.1 +/- 120.7%), Vo(2peak), trunk flexibility, and flexibility of the ipsilateral (surgical) and contralateral shoulder joint. Psychological QOL and overall QOL, evaluated via the World Health Organization Quality of Life Assessment Scale-Abbreviated Version. Inventory also improved significantly (p < 0.01). No incidents of lymphedema or injury were reported. These findings suggest that survivors of breast cancer can safely benefit from engaging in a full-body exercise regimen. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of strength and conditioning research Pubmed

Full-body exercise training improves fitness and quality of life in survivors of breast cancer.

Journal of strength and conditioning research , Volume 20 (1): 8 – Jul 20, 2006

Full-body exercise training improves fitness and quality of life in survivors of breast cancer.


Abstract

This study evaluated the safety and effectiveness of an 8-week full-body resistance and aerobic exercise program for 27 survivors of breast cancer (age, 57.7 +/- 7.2 years; years posttreatment, 0.8- 21.0) with prior upper-body conditioning. Physical fitness and quality-of-life (QOL) measures were obtained before and after the training period. Lymphedema, evaluated via arm volume measurement at baseline, was self-monitored throughout the trial. Sum of skinfolds, waist girth, and hip girth were significantly reduced posttraining (p < 0.01), although body weight did not change. Significant improvements (p < 0.01) were observed in upper-body strength (35.6 +/- 16.4%) and endurance (167.4 +/- 55.4%), lower-body strength (50.7 +/- 32.3%) and endurance (273.1 +/- 120.7%), Vo(2peak), trunk flexibility, and flexibility of the ipsilateral (surgical) and contralateral shoulder joint. Psychological QOL and overall QOL, evaluated via the World Health Organization Quality of Life Assessment Scale-Abbreviated Version. Inventory also improved significantly (p < 0.01). No incidents of lymphedema or injury were reported. These findings suggest that survivors of breast cancer can safely benefit from engaging in a full-body exercise regimen.

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ISSN
1064-8011
DOI
10.1519/R-17335.1
pmid
16506861

Abstract

This study evaluated the safety and effectiveness of an 8-week full-body resistance and aerobic exercise program for 27 survivors of breast cancer (age, 57.7 +/- 7.2 years; years posttreatment, 0.8- 21.0) with prior upper-body conditioning. Physical fitness and quality-of-life (QOL) measures were obtained before and after the training period. Lymphedema, evaluated via arm volume measurement at baseline, was self-monitored throughout the trial. Sum of skinfolds, waist girth, and hip girth were significantly reduced posttraining (p < 0.01), although body weight did not change. Significant improvements (p < 0.01) were observed in upper-body strength (35.6 +/- 16.4%) and endurance (167.4 +/- 55.4%), lower-body strength (50.7 +/- 32.3%) and endurance (273.1 +/- 120.7%), Vo(2peak), trunk flexibility, and flexibility of the ipsilateral (surgical) and contralateral shoulder joint. Psychological QOL and overall QOL, evaluated via the World Health Organization Quality of Life Assessment Scale-Abbreviated Version. Inventory also improved significantly (p < 0.01). No incidents of lymphedema or injury were reported. These findings suggest that survivors of breast cancer can safely benefit from engaging in a full-body exercise regimen.

Journal

Journal of strength and conditioning researchPubmed

Published: Jul 20, 2006

There are no references for this article.