Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

In situ transmission electron microscopy observation of pulverization of aluminum nanowires and evolution of the thin surface Al2O3 layers during lithiation-delithiation cycles.

In situ transmission electron microscopy observation of pulverization of aluminum nanowires and... Lithiation-delithiation cycles of individual aluminum nanowires (NWs) with naturally oxidized Al(2)O(3) surface layers (thickness 4-5 nm) were conducted in situ in a transmission electron microscope. Surprisingly, the lithiation was always initiated from the surface Al(2)O(3) layer, forming a stable Li-Al-O glass tube with a thickness of about 6-10 nm wrapping around the NW core. After lithiation of the surface Al(2)O(3) layer, lithiation of the inner Al core took place, which converted the single crystal Al to a polycrystalline LiAl alloy, with a volume expansion of about 100%. The Li-Al-O glass tube survived the 100% volume expansion, by enlarging through elastic and plastic deformation, acting as a solid electrolyte with exceptional mechanical robustness and ion conduction. Voids were formed in the Al NWs during the initial delithiation step and grew continuously with each subsequent delithiation, leading to pulverization of the Al NWs to isolated nanoparticles confined inside the Li-Al-O tube. There was a corresponding loss of capacity with each delithiation step when arrays of NWs were galvonostatically cycled. The results provide important insight into the degradation mechanism of lithium-alloy electrodes and into recent reports about the performance improvement of lithium ion batteries by atomic layer deposition of Al(2)O(3) onto the active materials or electrodes. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nano Letters Pubmed

In situ transmission electron microscopy observation of pulverization of aluminum nanowires and evolution of the thin surface Al2O3 layers during lithiation-delithiation cycles.

Nano Letters , Volume 11 (10): -4093 – Jan 19, 2012

In situ transmission electron microscopy observation of pulverization of aluminum nanowires and evolution of the thin surface Al2O3 layers during lithiation-delithiation cycles.


Abstract

Lithiation-delithiation cycles of individual aluminum nanowires (NWs) with naturally oxidized Al(2)O(3) surface layers (thickness 4-5 nm) were conducted in situ in a transmission electron microscope. Surprisingly, the lithiation was always initiated from the surface Al(2)O(3) layer, forming a stable Li-Al-O glass tube with a thickness of about 6-10 nm wrapping around the NW core. After lithiation of the surface Al(2)O(3) layer, lithiation of the inner Al core took place, which converted the single crystal Al to a polycrystalline LiAl alloy, with a volume expansion of about 100%. The Li-Al-O glass tube survived the 100% volume expansion, by enlarging through elastic and plastic deformation, acting as a solid electrolyte with exceptional mechanical robustness and ion conduction. Voids were formed in the Al NWs during the initial delithiation step and grew continuously with each subsequent delithiation, leading to pulverization of the Al NWs to isolated nanoparticles confined inside the Li-Al-O tube. There was a corresponding loss of capacity with each delithiation step when arrays of NWs were galvonostatically cycled. The results provide important insight into the degradation mechanism of lithium-alloy electrodes and into recent reports about the performance improvement of lithium ion batteries by atomic layer deposition of Al(2)O(3) onto the active materials or electrodes.

Loading next page...
 
/lp/pubmed/in-situ-transmission-electron-microscopy-observation-of-pulverization-lqMZb6EHr4

References

References for this paper are not available at this time. We will be adding them shortly, thank you for your patience.

ISSN
1530-6984
eISSN
1530-6992
DOI
10.1021/nl202088h
pmid
21875099

Abstract

Lithiation-delithiation cycles of individual aluminum nanowires (NWs) with naturally oxidized Al(2)O(3) surface layers (thickness 4-5 nm) were conducted in situ in a transmission electron microscope. Surprisingly, the lithiation was always initiated from the surface Al(2)O(3) layer, forming a stable Li-Al-O glass tube with a thickness of about 6-10 nm wrapping around the NW core. After lithiation of the surface Al(2)O(3) layer, lithiation of the inner Al core took place, which converted the single crystal Al to a polycrystalline LiAl alloy, with a volume expansion of about 100%. The Li-Al-O glass tube survived the 100% volume expansion, by enlarging through elastic and plastic deformation, acting as a solid electrolyte with exceptional mechanical robustness and ion conduction. Voids were formed in the Al NWs during the initial delithiation step and grew continuously with each subsequent delithiation, leading to pulverization of the Al NWs to isolated nanoparticles confined inside the Li-Al-O tube. There was a corresponding loss of capacity with each delithiation step when arrays of NWs were galvonostatically cycled. The results provide important insight into the degradation mechanism of lithium-alloy electrodes and into recent reports about the performance improvement of lithium ion batteries by atomic layer deposition of Al(2)O(3) onto the active materials or electrodes.

Journal

Nano LettersPubmed

Published: Jan 19, 2012

There are no references for this article.