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Intergroup bias: status, differentiation, and a common in-group identity.

Intergroup bias: status, differentiation, and a common in-group identity. The present research examined factors that moderate and mediate the reduction of intergroup bias. Two 3-person laboratory groups, which had first worked separately on a task, were informed prior to intergroup contact that (a) the groups were equal or unequal in status based on their task performance, and (b) they had been working on the same or on different task dimensions. Consistent with M. Hewstone and R. J. Brown's (1986) mutual intergroup differentiation model, bias was eliminated when the groups' areas of expertise were differentiated and equally valued (i.e., in the equal status-different dimensions conditions). Moreover, as expected on the basis of the common in-group identity model, more inclusive group representations mediated this effect. The findings of the present research thus offer a theoretical integration that can suggest interventions to facilitate positive intergroup contact. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of personality and social psychology Pubmed

Intergroup bias: status, differentiation, and a common in-group identity.

Journal of personality and social psychology , Volume 75 (1): 12 – Oct 28, 1998

Intergroup bias: status, differentiation, and a common in-group identity.


Abstract

The present research examined factors that moderate and mediate the reduction of intergroup bias. Two 3-person laboratory groups, which had first worked separately on a task, were informed prior to intergroup contact that (a) the groups were equal or unequal in status based on their task performance, and (b) they had been working on the same or on different task dimensions. Consistent with M. Hewstone and R. J. Brown's (1986) mutual intergroup differentiation model, bias was eliminated when the groups' areas of expertise were differentiated and equally valued (i.e., in the equal status-different dimensions conditions). Moreover, as expected on the basis of the common in-group identity model, more inclusive group representations mediated this effect. The findings of the present research thus offer a theoretical integration that can suggest interventions to facilitate positive intergroup contact.

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ISSN
0022-3514
DOI
10.1037//0022-3514.75.1.109
pmid
9686453

Abstract

The present research examined factors that moderate and mediate the reduction of intergroup bias. Two 3-person laboratory groups, which had first worked separately on a task, were informed prior to intergroup contact that (a) the groups were equal or unequal in status based on their task performance, and (b) they had been working on the same or on different task dimensions. Consistent with M. Hewstone and R. J. Brown's (1986) mutual intergroup differentiation model, bias was eliminated when the groups' areas of expertise were differentiated and equally valued (i.e., in the equal status-different dimensions conditions). Moreover, as expected on the basis of the common in-group identity model, more inclusive group representations mediated this effect. The findings of the present research thus offer a theoretical integration that can suggest interventions to facilitate positive intergroup contact.

Journal

Journal of personality and social psychologyPubmed

Published: Oct 28, 1998

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