Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Loss of physical functioning among patients with cancer: a longitudinal view.

Loss of physical functioning among patients with cancer: a longitudinal view. This study investigated, in a convenience sample of 279 patients with cancer, the trajectories of symptoms and loss of physical functioning over time, the relationships of these variables to age and co-morbidity, and differences existing according to cancer site (breast, lung, colorectal/gastrointestinal, urinary/reproductive, lymphoma, and "other"). The patients were surveyed twice; at intake (wave I, n = 279) and 6 months later (wave II, n = 160). Findings indicated, at wave I, that age and co-morbidity were significantly correlated, and loss of physical functioning was associated primarily with symptoms and, to a lesser degree, with age. Loss of function scores varied significantly according to cancer site, with higher levels for patients with lung cancer and lower levels for patients with breast or colorectal/gastrointestinal cancer. The most frequently occurring symptoms were fatigue, insomnia, pain, and nausea. Average levels of symptoms and loss of physical functioning were lower at wave II, indicative of a possible treatment-related effect (at wave II, a smaller percentage of patients had recently undergone treatment). Although co-morbidity was only modestly correlated with symptoms and loss of function for the total sample, it was highly correlated with both symptoms and loss of physical functioning for the younger patients (those younger than 60 years of age). The significant link that was identified between symptoms and loss of physical functioning has important implications for physicians, nurses, and other healthcare providers caring for patients with cancer as they deal with symptom management and quality-of-life issues. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Cancer practice Pubmed

Loss of physical functioning among patients with cancer: a longitudinal view.

Cancer practice , Volume 1 (4): 7 – Mar 31, 1994

Loss of physical functioning among patients with cancer: a longitudinal view.


Abstract

This study investigated, in a convenience sample of 279 patients with cancer, the trajectories of symptoms and loss of physical functioning over time, the relationships of these variables to age and co-morbidity, and differences existing according to cancer site (breast, lung, colorectal/gastrointestinal, urinary/reproductive, lymphoma, and "other"). The patients were surveyed twice; at intake (wave I, n = 279) and 6 months later (wave II, n = 160). Findings indicated, at wave I, that age and co-morbidity were significantly correlated, and loss of physical functioning was associated primarily with symptoms and, to a lesser degree, with age. Loss of function scores varied significantly according to cancer site, with higher levels for patients with lung cancer and lower levels for patients with breast or colorectal/gastrointestinal cancer. The most frequently occurring symptoms were fatigue, insomnia, pain, and nausea. Average levels of symptoms and loss of physical functioning were lower at wave II, indicative of a possible treatment-related effect (at wave II, a smaller percentage of patients had recently undergone treatment). Although co-morbidity was only modestly correlated with symptoms and loss of function for the total sample, it was highly correlated with both symptoms and loss of physical functioning for the younger patients (those younger than 60 years of age). The significant link that was identified between symptoms and loss of physical functioning has important implications for physicians, nurses, and other healthcare providers caring for patients with cancer as they deal with symptom management and quality-of-life issues.

Loading next page...
 
/lp/pubmed/loss-of-physical-functioning-among-patients-with-cancer-a-longitudinal-5CCynbzhQv

References

References for this paper are not available at this time. We will be adding them shortly, thank you for your patience.

ISSN
1065-4704
pmid
8111437

Abstract

This study investigated, in a convenience sample of 279 patients with cancer, the trajectories of symptoms and loss of physical functioning over time, the relationships of these variables to age and co-morbidity, and differences existing according to cancer site (breast, lung, colorectal/gastrointestinal, urinary/reproductive, lymphoma, and "other"). The patients were surveyed twice; at intake (wave I, n = 279) and 6 months later (wave II, n = 160). Findings indicated, at wave I, that age and co-morbidity were significantly correlated, and loss of physical functioning was associated primarily with symptoms and, to a lesser degree, with age. Loss of function scores varied significantly according to cancer site, with higher levels for patients with lung cancer and lower levels for patients with breast or colorectal/gastrointestinal cancer. The most frequently occurring symptoms were fatigue, insomnia, pain, and nausea. Average levels of symptoms and loss of physical functioning were lower at wave II, indicative of a possible treatment-related effect (at wave II, a smaller percentage of patients had recently undergone treatment). Although co-morbidity was only modestly correlated with symptoms and loss of function for the total sample, it was highly correlated with both symptoms and loss of physical functioning for the younger patients (those younger than 60 years of age). The significant link that was identified between symptoms and loss of physical functioning has important implications for physicians, nurses, and other healthcare providers caring for patients with cancer as they deal with symptom management and quality-of-life issues.

Journal

Cancer practicePubmed

Published: Mar 31, 1994

There are no references for this article.