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Modeling phosphorus concentrations in Irish rivers using land use, soil type, and soil phosphorus data.

Modeling phosphorus concentrations in Irish rivers using land use, soil type, and soil phosphorus... Modeling diffuse phosphorus (P) loss may indicate management strategies to minimize P loss from agricultural sources. An empirical model predicting flow-weighted phosphorus concentrations (MRP) was derived using data collected from 35 Irish river catchments. Monitoring records of riverine P and stream flow data were used to calculate MRP values averaged for the years 1991-1994. These data were modeled using land use, soil type, and soil P data. Soil type in catchments was described using soil survey classifications weighted according to their P desorption properties from laboratory results. Soil test P concentrations for the studied watersheds were obtained from a national database. Soil P levels were weighted based on the results of field experiments measuring P losses in overland flow from fields at different soil test P levels. The 35 catchments were statistically clustered into two populations (A and B) based on differences in soil type, specifically, soil hydrology. Catchments in Cluster A had predominantly poorly drained soils and comparatively higher MRP concentrations (0.03-0.17 mg L(-1)) than Cluster B areas (0.01-0.7 mg L(-1)) with mostly well-drained soils. Regression equations derived for A and B type catchments predicted MRP values with 68 and 62% of the variation explained in the models, respectively. Data extracted for the rest of the country were applied to the models to delineate areas at risk on a national scale. While the models were only moderately accurate they highlighted the influence of land management, specifically, high production grassland receiving high P inputs, in conjunction with the effect of soil type and soil hydrology on the transport of P to surface waters. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of environmental quality Pubmed

Modeling phosphorus concentrations in Irish rivers using land use, soil type, and soil phosphorus data.

Journal of environmental quality , Volume 31 (2): -580 – Sep 10, 2002

Modeling phosphorus concentrations in Irish rivers using land use, soil type, and soil phosphorus data.


Abstract

Modeling diffuse phosphorus (P) loss may indicate management strategies to minimize P loss from agricultural sources. An empirical model predicting flow-weighted phosphorus concentrations (MRP) was derived using data collected from 35 Irish river catchments. Monitoring records of riverine P and stream flow data were used to calculate MRP values averaged for the years 1991-1994. These data were modeled using land use, soil type, and soil P data. Soil type in catchments was described using soil survey classifications weighted according to their P desorption properties from laboratory results. Soil test P concentrations for the studied watersheds were obtained from a national database. Soil P levels were weighted based on the results of field experiments measuring P losses in overland flow from fields at different soil test P levels. The 35 catchments were statistically clustered into two populations (A and B) based on differences in soil type, specifically, soil hydrology. Catchments in Cluster A had predominantly poorly drained soils and comparatively higher MRP concentrations (0.03-0.17 mg L(-1)) than Cluster B areas (0.01-0.7 mg L(-1)) with mostly well-drained soils. Regression equations derived for A and B type catchments predicted MRP values with 68 and 62% of the variation explained in the models, respectively. Data extracted for the rest of the country were applied to the models to delineate areas at risk on a national scale. While the models were only moderately accurate they highlighted the influence of land management, specifically, high production grassland receiving high P inputs, in conjunction with the effect of soil type and soil hydrology on the transport of P to surface waters.

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ISSN
0047-2425
pmid
11931451

Abstract

Modeling diffuse phosphorus (P) loss may indicate management strategies to minimize P loss from agricultural sources. An empirical model predicting flow-weighted phosphorus concentrations (MRP) was derived using data collected from 35 Irish river catchments. Monitoring records of riverine P and stream flow data were used to calculate MRP values averaged for the years 1991-1994. These data were modeled using land use, soil type, and soil P data. Soil type in catchments was described using soil survey classifications weighted according to their P desorption properties from laboratory results. Soil test P concentrations for the studied watersheds were obtained from a national database. Soil P levels were weighted based on the results of field experiments measuring P losses in overland flow from fields at different soil test P levels. The 35 catchments were statistically clustered into two populations (A and B) based on differences in soil type, specifically, soil hydrology. Catchments in Cluster A had predominantly poorly drained soils and comparatively higher MRP concentrations (0.03-0.17 mg L(-1)) than Cluster B areas (0.01-0.7 mg L(-1)) with mostly well-drained soils. Regression equations derived for A and B type catchments predicted MRP values with 68 and 62% of the variation explained in the models, respectively. Data extracted for the rest of the country were applied to the models to delineate areas at risk on a national scale. While the models were only moderately accurate they highlighted the influence of land management, specifically, high production grassland receiving high P inputs, in conjunction with the effect of soil type and soil hydrology on the transport of P to surface waters.

Journal

Journal of environmental qualityPubmed

Published: Sep 10, 2002

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