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Overdoses: explanations and attitudes in self-poisoners and significant others.

Overdoses: explanations and attitudes in self-poisoners and significant others. Marked differences were found between the reasons chosen to explain overdoses by the closest relatives or friends (the 'significant others') of 34 self-poisoners and those reasons chosen by the self-poisoners themselves. Whilst 41% of the latter claimed suicidal intent, in only one case was the significant other in agreement. The significant others were more likely to attribute manipulative reasons, commonly viewing the overdoses as directed at themselves, but the two groups agreed that the overdoses were often a means of alleviating distress. As well as evoking sympathy, the overdoses often caused the significant others to feel considerable guilt and anger. Discrepancies in the way self-poisoners and significant others interpret overdoses, and the strong feelings that overdoses evoke in the latter, should be considered during assessment and treatment of overdose patients. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The British journal of psychiatry : the journal of mental science Pubmed

Overdoses: explanations and attitudes in self-poisoners and significant others.

The British journal of psychiatry : the journal of mental science , Volume 146: -475 – Aug 27, 1985

Overdoses: explanations and attitudes in self-poisoners and significant others.


Abstract

Marked differences were found between the reasons chosen to explain overdoses by the closest relatives or friends (the 'significant others') of 34 self-poisoners and those reasons chosen by the self-poisoners themselves. Whilst 41% of the latter claimed suicidal intent, in only one case was the significant other in agreement. The significant others were more likely to attribute manipulative reasons, commonly viewing the overdoses as directed at themselves, but the two groups agreed that the overdoses were often a means of alleviating distress. As well as evoking sympathy, the overdoses often caused the significant others to feel considerable guilt and anger. Discrepancies in the way self-poisoners and significant others interpret overdoses, and the strong feelings that overdoses evoke in the latter, should be considered during assessment and treatment of overdose patients.

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ISSN
0007-1250
DOI
10.1192/bjp.146.5.481
pmid
4016455

Abstract

Marked differences were found between the reasons chosen to explain overdoses by the closest relatives or friends (the 'significant others') of 34 self-poisoners and those reasons chosen by the self-poisoners themselves. Whilst 41% of the latter claimed suicidal intent, in only one case was the significant other in agreement. The significant others were more likely to attribute manipulative reasons, commonly viewing the overdoses as directed at themselves, but the two groups agreed that the overdoses were often a means of alleviating distress. As well as evoking sympathy, the overdoses often caused the significant others to feel considerable guilt and anger. Discrepancies in the way self-poisoners and significant others interpret overdoses, and the strong feelings that overdoses evoke in the latter, should be considered during assessment and treatment of overdose patients.

Journal

The British journal of psychiatry : the journal of mental sciencePubmed

Published: Aug 27, 1985

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