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Oxidative degradation of glyphosate and aminomethylphosphonate by manganese oxide.

Oxidative degradation of glyphosate and aminomethylphosphonate by manganese oxide. Glyphosate (N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine), the most commonly used herbicide worldwide, degrades relatively rapidly in soils under most conditions, presumably by microbial processes. The most frequently detected degradation product in soil and water is AMPA (aminomethylphosphonic acid). We report the first evidence for an abiotic pathway of glyphosate and AMPA degradation under environmentally realistic conditions. Both glyphosate and AMPA degraded at 20 degrees C in dilute aqueous suspensions of birnessite, a manganese oxide common in soils, as evidenced by the accumulation of orthophosphate in solution over a period of several days. It is concluded that the abiotic degradation involved C-P bond cleavage at the Mn oxide surface, although evidence for C-N bond cleavage in the case of glyphosate and sarcosine, a likely degradation product of glyphosate, was found. The degradation of glyphosate was faster than that of AMPA, and higher temperature (50 degrees C) resulted in faster degradation of both glyphosate and AMPA. The addition of sulfate to the solution had no marked effect on the reaction rate, although Cu2+ addition inhibited degradation. As this metal ion complexes strongly with glyphosate, the inhibition can be attributed to the ability of Cu2+ to limit glyphosate coordination to reactive oxidation sites at the Mn oxide surface. Using a similar experimental design, we were unable to detect glyphosate degradation in an equimolar solution of MnCl2 (0.5 mM). However, we demonstrated that the oxidation of Mn2+ is enhanced both in solution and on an inert surface, in the presence of glyphosate (4:1 Mn-glyphosate molar ratio). This result suggests that the oxidative breakdown of glyphosate in the presence of Mn2+ may ultimately occur following the spontaneous oxygen-mediated oxidation of manganese. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Environmental Science & Technology Pubmed

Oxidative degradation of glyphosate and aminomethylphosphonate by manganese oxide.

Environmental Science & Technology , Volume 39 (23): -9214 – Apr 11, 2006

Oxidative degradation of glyphosate and aminomethylphosphonate by manganese oxide.


Abstract

Glyphosate (N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine), the most commonly used herbicide worldwide, degrades relatively rapidly in soils under most conditions, presumably by microbial processes. The most frequently detected degradation product in soil and water is AMPA (aminomethylphosphonic acid). We report the first evidence for an abiotic pathway of glyphosate and AMPA degradation under environmentally realistic conditions. Both glyphosate and AMPA degraded at 20 degrees C in dilute aqueous suspensions of birnessite, a manganese oxide common in soils, as evidenced by the accumulation of orthophosphate in solution over a period of several days. It is concluded that the abiotic degradation involved C-P bond cleavage at the Mn oxide surface, although evidence for C-N bond cleavage in the case of glyphosate and sarcosine, a likely degradation product of glyphosate, was found. The degradation of glyphosate was faster than that of AMPA, and higher temperature (50 degrees C) resulted in faster degradation of both glyphosate and AMPA. The addition of sulfate to the solution had no marked effect on the reaction rate, although Cu2+ addition inhibited degradation. As this metal ion complexes strongly with glyphosate, the inhibition can be attributed to the ability of Cu2+ to limit glyphosate coordination to reactive oxidation sites at the Mn oxide surface. Using a similar experimental design, we were unable to detect glyphosate degradation in an equimolar solution of MnCl2 (0.5 mM). However, we demonstrated that the oxidation of Mn2+ is enhanced both in solution and on an inert surface, in the presence of glyphosate (4:1 Mn-glyphosate molar ratio). This result suggests that the oxidative breakdown of glyphosate in the presence of Mn2+ may ultimately occur following the spontaneous oxygen-mediated oxidation of manganese.

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References (17)

ISSN
0013-936X
DOI
10.1021/es051342d
pmid
16382946
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Glyphosate (N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine), the most commonly used herbicide worldwide, degrades relatively rapidly in soils under most conditions, presumably by microbial processes. The most frequently detected degradation product in soil and water is AMPA (aminomethylphosphonic acid). We report the first evidence for an abiotic pathway of glyphosate and AMPA degradation under environmentally realistic conditions. Both glyphosate and AMPA degraded at 20 degrees C in dilute aqueous suspensions of birnessite, a manganese oxide common in soils, as evidenced by the accumulation of orthophosphate in solution over a period of several days. It is concluded that the abiotic degradation involved C-P bond cleavage at the Mn oxide surface, although evidence for C-N bond cleavage in the case of glyphosate and sarcosine, a likely degradation product of glyphosate, was found. The degradation of glyphosate was faster than that of AMPA, and higher temperature (50 degrees C) resulted in faster degradation of both glyphosate and AMPA. The addition of sulfate to the solution had no marked effect on the reaction rate, although Cu2+ addition inhibited degradation. As this metal ion complexes strongly with glyphosate, the inhibition can be attributed to the ability of Cu2+ to limit glyphosate coordination to reactive oxidation sites at the Mn oxide surface. Using a similar experimental design, we were unable to detect glyphosate degradation in an equimolar solution of MnCl2 (0.5 mM). However, we demonstrated that the oxidation of Mn2+ is enhanced both in solution and on an inert surface, in the presence of glyphosate (4:1 Mn-glyphosate molar ratio). This result suggests that the oxidative breakdown of glyphosate in the presence of Mn2+ may ultimately occur following the spontaneous oxygen-mediated oxidation of manganese.

Journal

Environmental Science & TechnologyPubmed

Published: Apr 11, 2006

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