Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Subscribe now for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Physicochemical roles of soluble metal cations in the outer membrane of Escherichia coli K-12.

Physicochemical roles of soluble metal cations in the outer membrane of Escherichia coli K-12. Atomic absorption spectroscopy of isolated native and EDTA-modified (lipopolysaccharide-depleted) outer membrane revealed trace amounts of potassium, manganese, and iron (1.0-7.0 nmol/mg dry weight outer membrane). Sodium, magnesium, and calcium were approximately one order of magnitude more plentiful, but EDTA-modified outer membrane was deficient in calcium. When metal-binding assays were conducted to find the binding capacity of native and EDTA-modified outer membrane, potassium bound poorly compared with sodium. However, there was no difference in the binding of these ions between the OM preparations. In contrast, reduced amounts of magnesium, calcium, manganese, and iron III bound to the EDTA-modified OM. Partitioning of intact cells in a biphasic dextran-polyethyleneglycol system indicated that the reduced lipopolysaccharide content of the EDTA-modified outer membrane increased the hydrophobicity of the cell surface. Exposure of control and EDTA-treated cells to divalent metal salt solutions before phase partitioning also increased cell surface hydrophobicity. Freeze-etching showed that sodium ions had no effect on the membrane fractures observed in control cells, but with EDTA-treated cells, this cation increased the occurrence of small outer membrane fractures (plateaus) which are characteristic of EDTA treatment. Both magnesium and manganese increased the frequency of outer membrane cleavage in control cells, whereas calcium did not. In contrast, all three divalent metallic ions increased the frequency and extent of cleavage in the outer membrane of EDTA-treated cells. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Canadian journal of microbiology Pubmed

Physicochemical roles of soluble metal cations in the outer membrane of Escherichia coli K-12.

Canadian journal of microbiology , Volume 32 (7): 8 – Oct 20, 1986

Physicochemical roles of soluble metal cations in the outer membrane of Escherichia coli K-12.


Abstract

Atomic absorption spectroscopy of isolated native and EDTA-modified (lipopolysaccharide-depleted) outer membrane revealed trace amounts of potassium, manganese, and iron (1.0-7.0 nmol/mg dry weight outer membrane). Sodium, magnesium, and calcium were approximately one order of magnitude more plentiful, but EDTA-modified outer membrane was deficient in calcium. When metal-binding assays were conducted to find the binding capacity of native and EDTA-modified outer membrane, potassium bound poorly compared with sodium. However, there was no difference in the binding of these ions between the OM preparations. In contrast, reduced amounts of magnesium, calcium, manganese, and iron III bound to the EDTA-modified OM. Partitioning of intact cells in a biphasic dextran-polyethyleneglycol system indicated that the reduced lipopolysaccharide content of the EDTA-modified outer membrane increased the hydrophobicity of the cell surface. Exposure of control and EDTA-treated cells to divalent metal salt solutions before phase partitioning also increased cell surface hydrophobicity. Freeze-etching showed that sodium ions had no effect on the membrane fractures observed in control cells, but with EDTA-treated cells, this cation increased the occurrence of small outer membrane fractures (plateaus) which are characteristic of EDTA treatment. Both magnesium and manganese increased the frequency of outer membrane cleavage in control cells, whereas calcium did not. In contrast, all three divalent metallic ions increased the frequency and extent of cleavage in the outer membrane of EDTA-treated cells.

Loading next page...
 
/lp/pubmed/physicochemical-roles-of-soluble-metal-cations-in-the-outer-membrane-Eaa39mLW1Z

References

References for this paper are not available at this time. We will be adding them shortly, thank you for your patience.

ISSN
0008-4166
DOI
10.1139/m86-110
pmid
3091229

Abstract

Atomic absorption spectroscopy of isolated native and EDTA-modified (lipopolysaccharide-depleted) outer membrane revealed trace amounts of potassium, manganese, and iron (1.0-7.0 nmol/mg dry weight outer membrane). Sodium, magnesium, and calcium were approximately one order of magnitude more plentiful, but EDTA-modified outer membrane was deficient in calcium. When metal-binding assays were conducted to find the binding capacity of native and EDTA-modified outer membrane, potassium bound poorly compared with sodium. However, there was no difference in the binding of these ions between the OM preparations. In contrast, reduced amounts of magnesium, calcium, manganese, and iron III bound to the EDTA-modified OM. Partitioning of intact cells in a biphasic dextran-polyethyleneglycol system indicated that the reduced lipopolysaccharide content of the EDTA-modified outer membrane increased the hydrophobicity of the cell surface. Exposure of control and EDTA-treated cells to divalent metal salt solutions before phase partitioning also increased cell surface hydrophobicity. Freeze-etching showed that sodium ions had no effect on the membrane fractures observed in control cells, but with EDTA-treated cells, this cation increased the occurrence of small outer membrane fractures (plateaus) which are characteristic of EDTA treatment. Both magnesium and manganese increased the frequency of outer membrane cleavage in control cells, whereas calcium did not. In contrast, all three divalent metallic ions increased the frequency and extent of cleavage in the outer membrane of EDTA-treated cells.

Journal

Canadian journal of microbiologyPubmed

Published: Oct 20, 1986

There are no references for this article.