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Primary amebic meningoencephalitis in Florida: a case report and epidemiological review of Florida cases.

Primary amebic meningoencephalitis in Florida: a case report and epidemiological review of... Primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) is a rare but nearly always fatal infection of the central nervous system caused by the thermophilic, free-living ameba Naegleria fowleri. Since its first description in 1965 through 2010, 118 cases have been reported in the U.S.; all cases are related to environmental exposure to warm freshwater; most have occurred in children and adolescents and are associated with recreational water activities, such as swimming, diving, or playing in freshwater lakes, ponds, or rivers. Over one-fourth of all national PAM cases have occurred in Florida. The authors describe here a fatal case of PAM in a resident of northeast Florida and the ensuing environmental and public health investigation; they also provide a review of all cases of PAM in Florida from 1962 to 2010 and discuss public health responses to PAM in Florida, highlighting opportunities for positive collaboration between state and local environmental health specialists, epidemiologists, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of environmental health Pubmed

Primary amebic meningoencephalitis in Florida: a case report and epidemiological review of Florida cases.

Primary amebic meningoencephalitis in Florida: a case report and epidemiological review of Florida cases.


Abstract

Primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) is a rare but nearly always fatal infection of the central nervous system caused by the thermophilic, free-living ameba Naegleria fowleri. Since its first description in 1965 through 2010, 118 cases have been reported in the U.S.; all cases are related to environmental exposure to warm freshwater; most have occurred in children and adolescents and are associated with recreational water activities, such as swimming, diving, or playing in freshwater lakes, ponds, or rivers. Over one-fourth of all national PAM cases have occurred in Florida. The authors describe here a fatal case of PAM in a resident of northeast Florida and the ensuing environmental and public health investigation; they also provide a review of all cases of PAM in Florida from 1962 to 2010 and discuss public health responses to PAM in Florida, highlighting opportunities for positive collaboration between state and local environmental health specialists, epidemiologists, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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ISSN
0022-0892
pmid
23621053

Abstract

Primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) is a rare but nearly always fatal infection of the central nervous system caused by the thermophilic, free-living ameba Naegleria fowleri. Since its first description in 1965 through 2010, 118 cases have been reported in the U.S.; all cases are related to environmental exposure to warm freshwater; most have occurred in children and adolescents and are associated with recreational water activities, such as swimming, diving, or playing in freshwater lakes, ponds, or rivers. Over one-fourth of all national PAM cases have occurred in Florida. The authors describe here a fatal case of PAM in a resident of northeast Florida and the ensuing environmental and public health investigation; they also provide a review of all cases of PAM in Florida from 1962 to 2010 and discuss public health responses to PAM in Florida, highlighting opportunities for positive collaboration between state and local environmental health specialists, epidemiologists, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Journal

Journal of environmental healthPubmed

Published: Sep 10, 2013

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