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Primordial GATA6 macrophages function as extravascular platelets in sterile injury.

Primordial GATA6 macrophages function as extravascular platelets in sterile injury. Most multicellular organisms have a major body cavity that harbors immune cells. In primordial species such as purple sea urchins, these cells perform phagocytic functions but are also crucial in repairing injuries. In mammals, the peritoneal cavity contains large numbers of resident GATA6+ macrophages, which may function similarly. However, it is unclear how cavity macrophages suspended in the fluid phase (peritoneal fluid) identify and migrate toward injuries. In this study, we used intravital microscopy to show that cavity macrophages in fluid rapidly form thrombus-like structures in response to injury by means of primordial scavenger receptor cysteine-rich domains. Aggregates of cavity macrophages physically sealed injuries and promoted rapid repair of focal lesions. In iatrogenic surgical situations, these cavity macrophages formed extensive aggregates that promoted the growth of intra-abdominal scar tissue known as peritoneal adhesions. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Science (New York, N.Y.) Pubmed

Primordial GATA6 macrophages function as extravascular platelets in sterile injury.

Science (New York, N.Y.) , Volume 371 (6533): 1 – Mar 31, 2021

Primordial GATA6 macrophages function as extravascular platelets in sterile injury.


Abstract

Most multicellular organisms have a major body cavity that harbors immune cells. In primordial species such as purple sea urchins, these cells perform phagocytic functions but are also crucial in repairing injuries. In mammals, the peritoneal cavity contains large numbers of resident GATA6+ macrophages, which may function similarly. However, it is unclear how cavity macrophages suspended in the fluid phase (peritoneal fluid) identify and migrate toward injuries. In this study, we used intravital microscopy to show that cavity macrophages in fluid rapidly form thrombus-like structures in response to injury by means of primordial scavenger receptor cysteine-rich domains. Aggregates of cavity macrophages physically sealed injuries and promoted rapid repair of focal lesions. In iatrogenic surgical situations, these cavity macrophages formed extensive aggregates that promoted the growth of intra-abdominal scar tissue known as peritoneal adhesions.

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Copyright
Copyright © 2021 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.
eISSN
1095-9203
DOI
10.1126/science.abe0595
pmid
33674464

Abstract

Most multicellular organisms have a major body cavity that harbors immune cells. In primordial species such as purple sea urchins, these cells perform phagocytic functions but are also crucial in repairing injuries. In mammals, the peritoneal cavity contains large numbers of resident GATA6+ macrophages, which may function similarly. However, it is unclear how cavity macrophages suspended in the fluid phase (peritoneal fluid) identify and migrate toward injuries. In this study, we used intravital microscopy to show that cavity macrophages in fluid rapidly form thrombus-like structures in response to injury by means of primordial scavenger receptor cysteine-rich domains. Aggregates of cavity macrophages physically sealed injuries and promoted rapid repair of focal lesions. In iatrogenic surgical situations, these cavity macrophages formed extensive aggregates that promoted the growth of intra-abdominal scar tissue known as peritoneal adhesions.

Journal

Science (New York, N.Y.)Pubmed

Published: Mar 31, 2021

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