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Role of Rab GTPases in Alzheimer's Disease.

Role of Rab GTPases in Alzheimer's Disease. Alzheimer's disease (AD) comprises two major pathological hallmarks: extraneuronal deposition of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides ("senile plaques") and intraneuronal aggregation of the microtubule-associated protein tau ("neurofibrillary tangles"). Aβ is derived from sequential cleavage of the β-amyloid precursor protein by β- and γ-secretases, while aggregated tau is hyperphosphorylated in AD. Mounting evidence suggests that dysregulated trafficking of these AD-related proteins contributes to AD pathogenesis. Rab proteins are small GTPases that function as master regulators of vesicular transport and membrane trafficking. Multiple Rab GTPases have been implicated in AD-related protein trafficking, and their expression has been observed to be altered in postmortem AD brain. Here we review current implicated roles of Rab GTPase dysregulation in AD pathogenesis. Further elucidation of the pathophysiological role of Rab GTPases will likely reveal novel targets for AD therapeutics. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png ACS Chemical Neuroscience Pubmed

Role of Rab GTPases in Alzheimer's Disease.

ACS Chemical Neuroscience , Volume 10 (2): 11 – Feb 26, 2020

Role of Rab GTPases in Alzheimer's Disease.


Abstract

Alzheimer's disease (AD) comprises two major pathological hallmarks: extraneuronal deposition of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides ("senile plaques") and intraneuronal aggregation of the microtubule-associated protein tau ("neurofibrillary tangles"). Aβ is derived from sequential cleavage of the β-amyloid precursor protein by β- and γ-secretases, while aggregated tau is hyperphosphorylated in AD. Mounting evidence suggests that dysregulated trafficking of these AD-related proteins contributes to AD pathogenesis. Rab proteins are small GTPases that function as master regulators of vesicular transport and membrane trafficking. Multiple Rab GTPases have been implicated in AD-related protein trafficking, and their expression has been observed to be altered in postmortem AD brain. Here we review current implicated roles of Rab GTPase dysregulation in AD pathogenesis. Further elucidation of the pathophysiological role of Rab GTPases will likely reveal novel targets for AD therapeutics.

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ISSN
1948-7193
DOI
10.1021/acschemneuro.8b00387
pmid
30261139

Abstract

Alzheimer's disease (AD) comprises two major pathological hallmarks: extraneuronal deposition of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides ("senile plaques") and intraneuronal aggregation of the microtubule-associated protein tau ("neurofibrillary tangles"). Aβ is derived from sequential cleavage of the β-amyloid precursor protein by β- and γ-secretases, while aggregated tau is hyperphosphorylated in AD. Mounting evidence suggests that dysregulated trafficking of these AD-related proteins contributes to AD pathogenesis. Rab proteins are small GTPases that function as master regulators of vesicular transport and membrane trafficking. Multiple Rab GTPases have been implicated in AD-related protein trafficking, and their expression has been observed to be altered in postmortem AD brain. Here we review current implicated roles of Rab GTPase dysregulation in AD pathogenesis. Further elucidation of the pathophysiological role of Rab GTPases will likely reveal novel targets for AD therapeutics.

Journal

ACS Chemical NeurosciencePubmed

Published: Feb 26, 2020

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