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Screening for the detection of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, their metabolites, and AT II receptor antagonists.

Screening for the detection of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, their metabolites, and... A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) screening procedure was developed for the detection of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, their metabolites, and angiotensin (AT) II receptor antagonists in urine as part of a systematic toxicologic analysis procedure for acidic drugs and poisons after extractive methylation. The part of the phase-transfer catalyst remaining in the organic phase was removed by solid phase extraction on a diol phase. The compounds were separated by capillary GC and identified by computerized MS in the full scan mode. Using mass chromatography with the ions m/z 157, 160, 172, 192, 204, 220, 234, 248, 249, and 262, the possible presence of ACE inhibitors, their metabolites, and AT II antagonists could be indicated. The identity of positive signals in such mass chromatograms was confirmed by comparison of the peaks underlying full mass spectra with the reference spectra recorded during this study. This method allowed detection of therapeutic concentrations of ACE inhibitors (benazepril, enalapril, perindopril, quinapril, ramipril, trandolapril, their metabolites, or both) and therapeutic concentrations of the AT II antagonist, valsartan, in human urine samples. Human urine samples were not available for testing cilazapril, moexipril, and losartan; they were detected only in rat urine. The overall recoveries of ACE inhibitors ranged between 80% and 88%, with a coefficient of variation (CV) of less than 10% and the limit of detection of at least 10 ng/ml (signal to noise ratio 3) in the full-scan mode. The overall recovery of the valsartan was 68%, with a CV of less than 10%; the limit of detection was at least 10 ng/ml (S/N 3) in the full scan mode. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Therapeutic drug monitoring Pubmed

Screening for the detection of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, their metabolites, and AT II receptor antagonists.

Therapeutic drug monitoring , Volume 20 (6): 8 – Apr 27, 1999

Screening for the detection of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, their metabolites, and AT II receptor antagonists.


Abstract

A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) screening procedure was developed for the detection of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, their metabolites, and angiotensin (AT) II receptor antagonists in urine as part of a systematic toxicologic analysis procedure for acidic drugs and poisons after extractive methylation. The part of the phase-transfer catalyst remaining in the organic phase was removed by solid phase extraction on a diol phase. The compounds were separated by capillary GC and identified by computerized MS in the full scan mode. Using mass chromatography with the ions m/z 157, 160, 172, 192, 204, 220, 234, 248, 249, and 262, the possible presence of ACE inhibitors, their metabolites, and AT II antagonists could be indicated. The identity of positive signals in such mass chromatograms was confirmed by comparison of the peaks underlying full mass spectra with the reference spectra recorded during this study. This method allowed detection of therapeutic concentrations of ACE inhibitors (benazepril, enalapril, perindopril, quinapril, ramipril, trandolapril, their metabolites, or both) and therapeutic concentrations of the AT II antagonist, valsartan, in human urine samples. Human urine samples were not available for testing cilazapril, moexipril, and losartan; they were detected only in rat urine. The overall recoveries of ACE inhibitors ranged between 80% and 88%, with a coefficient of variation (CV) of less than 10% and the limit of detection of at least 10 ng/ml (signal to noise ratio 3) in the full-scan mode. The overall recovery of the valsartan was 68%, with a CV of less than 10%; the limit of detection was at least 10 ng/ml (S/N 3) in the full scan mode.

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ISSN
0163-4356
DOI
10.1097/00007691-199812000-00022
pmid
9853992

Abstract

A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) screening procedure was developed for the detection of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, their metabolites, and angiotensin (AT) II receptor antagonists in urine as part of a systematic toxicologic analysis procedure for acidic drugs and poisons after extractive methylation. The part of the phase-transfer catalyst remaining in the organic phase was removed by solid phase extraction on a diol phase. The compounds were separated by capillary GC and identified by computerized MS in the full scan mode. Using mass chromatography with the ions m/z 157, 160, 172, 192, 204, 220, 234, 248, 249, and 262, the possible presence of ACE inhibitors, their metabolites, and AT II antagonists could be indicated. The identity of positive signals in such mass chromatograms was confirmed by comparison of the peaks underlying full mass spectra with the reference spectra recorded during this study. This method allowed detection of therapeutic concentrations of ACE inhibitors (benazepril, enalapril, perindopril, quinapril, ramipril, trandolapril, their metabolites, or both) and therapeutic concentrations of the AT II antagonist, valsartan, in human urine samples. Human urine samples were not available for testing cilazapril, moexipril, and losartan; they were detected only in rat urine. The overall recoveries of ACE inhibitors ranged between 80% and 88%, with a coefficient of variation (CV) of less than 10% and the limit of detection of at least 10 ng/ml (signal to noise ratio 3) in the full-scan mode. The overall recovery of the valsartan was 68%, with a CV of less than 10%; the limit of detection was at least 10 ng/ml (S/N 3) in the full scan mode.

Journal

Therapeutic drug monitoringPubmed

Published: Apr 27, 1999

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