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The role of superantigens in skin disease.

The role of superantigens in skin disease. Staphylococcus aureus and streptococci secrete a large family of exotoxins involved in the pathogenesis of toxic-shock-like syndromes and have been implicated in several autoimmune disorders. These toxins act as prototypic superantigens capable of binding to major histocompatibility complex proteins on antigen-presenting cells outside the antigen peptide-binding groove and can thereby stimulate cytokine release from macrophages. The superantigen-major histocompatibility complex unit is recognized primarily by the variable region of the T-cell receptor beta chain, and by engaging this region, can activate a large portion of the T-cell repertoire. It is thought that the capacity of these toxins to cause the massive stimulation of T cells and accessory cells such as macrophages, Langerhans cells, and activated keratinocytes accounts for most of their pathologic effects. The current review examines the evidence that implicates a role for these superantigens in the pathogenesis of certain skin diseases. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of investigative dermatology Pubmed

The role of superantigens in skin disease.

The Journal of investigative dermatology , Volume 105 (1 Suppl): 3706 – Aug 22, 1995

The role of superantigens in skin disease.


Abstract

Staphylococcus aureus and streptococci secrete a large family of exotoxins involved in the pathogenesis of toxic-shock-like syndromes and have been implicated in several autoimmune disorders. These toxins act as prototypic superantigens capable of binding to major histocompatibility complex proteins on antigen-presenting cells outside the antigen peptide-binding groove and can thereby stimulate cytokine release from macrophages. The superantigen-major histocompatibility complex unit is recognized primarily by the variable region of the T-cell receptor beta chain, and by engaging this region, can activate a large portion of the T-cell repertoire. It is thought that the capacity of these toxins to cause the massive stimulation of T cells and accessory cells such as macrophages, Langerhans cells, and activated keratinocytes accounts for most of their pathologic effects. The current review examines the evidence that implicates a role for these superantigens in the pathogenesis of certain skin diseases.

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ISSN
0022-202X
DOI
10.1111/1523-1747.ep12315250
pmid
7615995

Abstract

Staphylococcus aureus and streptococci secrete a large family of exotoxins involved in the pathogenesis of toxic-shock-like syndromes and have been implicated in several autoimmune disorders. These toxins act as prototypic superantigens capable of binding to major histocompatibility complex proteins on antigen-presenting cells outside the antigen peptide-binding groove and can thereby stimulate cytokine release from macrophages. The superantigen-major histocompatibility complex unit is recognized primarily by the variable region of the T-cell receptor beta chain, and by engaging this region, can activate a large portion of the T-cell repertoire. It is thought that the capacity of these toxins to cause the massive stimulation of T cells and accessory cells such as macrophages, Langerhans cells, and activated keratinocytes accounts for most of their pathologic effects. The current review examines the evidence that implicates a role for these superantigens in the pathogenesis of certain skin diseases.

Journal

The Journal of investigative dermatologyPubmed

Published: Aug 22, 1995

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