Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Subscribe now for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The U.S. Carbon budget: contributions from land-Use change

The U.S. Carbon budget: contributions from land-Use change The rates at which lands in the United States were cleared for agriculture, abandoned, harvested for wood, and burned were reconstructed from historical data for the period 1700-1990 and used in a terrestrial carbon model to calculate annual changes in the amount of carbon stored in terrestrial ecosystems, including wood products. Changes in land use released 27 +/- 6 petagrams of carbon to the atmosphere before 1945 and accumulated 2 +/- 2 petagrams of carbon after 1945, largely as a result of fire suppression and forest growth on abandoned farmlands. During the 1980s, the net flux of carbon attributable to land management offset 10 to 30 percent of U.S. fossil fuel emissions. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Science (New York, N.Y.) Pubmed

The U.S. Carbon budget: contributions from land-Use change

Science (New York, N.Y.) , Volume 285 (5427): -565 – Jun 20, 2019

The U.S. Carbon budget: contributions from land-Use change


Abstract

The rates at which lands in the United States were cleared for agriculture, abandoned, harvested for wood, and burned were reconstructed from historical data for the period 1700-1990 and used in a terrestrial carbon model to calculate annual changes in the amount of carbon stored in terrestrial ecosystems, including wood products. Changes in land use released 27 +/- 6 petagrams of carbon to the atmosphere before 1945 and accumulated 2 +/- 2 petagrams of carbon after 1945, largely as a result of fire suppression and forest growth on abandoned farmlands. During the 1980s, the net flux of carbon attributable to land management offset 10 to 30 percent of U.S. fossil fuel emissions.

Loading next page...
 
/lp/pubmed/the-u-s-carbon-budget-contributions-from-land-use-change-AyVAA0XEMH

References

References for this paper are not available at this time. We will be adding them shortly, thank you for your patience.

ISSN
0036-8075
DOI
10.1126/science.285.5427.574
pmid
10417385

Abstract

The rates at which lands in the United States were cleared for agriculture, abandoned, harvested for wood, and burned were reconstructed from historical data for the period 1700-1990 and used in a terrestrial carbon model to calculate annual changes in the amount of carbon stored in terrestrial ecosystems, including wood products. Changes in land use released 27 +/- 6 petagrams of carbon to the atmosphere before 1945 and accumulated 2 +/- 2 petagrams of carbon after 1945, largely as a result of fire suppression and forest growth on abandoned farmlands. During the 1980s, the net flux of carbon attributable to land management offset 10 to 30 percent of U.S. fossil fuel emissions.

Journal

Science (New York, N.Y.)Pubmed

Published: Jun 20, 2019

There are no references for this article.