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Women's anger: relationship of suppression to blood pressure.

Women's anger: relationship of suppression to blood pressure. The relationship of anger suppression to blood pressure was examined in a university sample of 210 female staff, faculty, and students 18 to 71 years of age. Most were White and in good or excellent health. The study replicated that of Goldstein et al. (1988) using their method of assessing anger frequency, intensity, and expression at work (or school) and home. With age, body mass index, family history of hypertension, and exercise controlled, higher systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure were evident when women suppressed anger at home. Women who had grown up in families that readily showed anger were more likely to do so as adults. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing research Pubmed

Women's anger: relationship of suppression to blood pressure.

Nursing research , Volume 46 (6): 7 – Jan 22, 1998

Women's anger: relationship of suppression to blood pressure.


Abstract

The relationship of anger suppression to blood pressure was examined in a university sample of 210 female staff, faculty, and students 18 to 71 years of age. Most were White and in good or excellent health. The study replicated that of Goldstein et al. (1988) using their method of assessing anger frequency, intensity, and expression at work (or school) and home. With age, body mass index, family history of hypertension, and exercise controlled, higher systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure were evident when women suppressed anger at home. Women who had grown up in families that readily showed anger were more likely to do so as adults.

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ISSN
0029-6562
DOI
10.1097/00006199-199711000-00005
pmid
9422051

Abstract

The relationship of anger suppression to blood pressure was examined in a university sample of 210 female staff, faculty, and students 18 to 71 years of age. Most were White and in good or excellent health. The study replicated that of Goldstein et al. (1988) using their method of assessing anger frequency, intensity, and expression at work (or school) and home. With age, body mass index, family history of hypertension, and exercise controlled, higher systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure were evident when women suppressed anger at home. Women who had grown up in families that readily showed anger were more likely to do so as adults.

Journal

Nursing researchPubmed

Published: Jan 22, 1998

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