Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Women's perspectives regarding the impact of ovarian cancer: implications for nursing.

Women's perspectives regarding the impact of ovarian cancer: implications for nursing. Ovarian cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in women. Ovarian cancer and its treatment have a considerable effect on the quality of life of women diagnosed with the disease. Currently, little is known about the perspectives of women regarding their experiences of living with ovarian cancer or the impact of recurrent disease. This article presents data from a national study of Canadian women living with ovarian cancer and describes the impact of the disease and its treatment. In this study, 93 women had recurrent disease, and 170 had not experienced recurrent disease. Women in both groups were similar, ranging in age from 21 to 61 years. Two-thirds of the women were married, and all were white. A greater proportion of the women with recurrent disease reported bowel problems; fears of dying, pain, getting around; and feelings of self-blame. On the average, women with recurrent disease reported experiencing more problems since diagnosis than those without recurrent disease (p = 0.01). The proportion of women who perceived that they received adequate help for their problems ranged from 20% to 85%. Implications for oncology nurses regarding assessment, referral for assistance, and patient education are apparent from the study findings. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Cancer nursing Pubmed

Women's perspectives regarding the impact of ovarian cancer: implications for nursing.

Cancer nursing , Volume 23 (5): 8 – Nov 3, 2000

Women's perspectives regarding the impact of ovarian cancer: implications for nursing.


Abstract

Ovarian cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in women. Ovarian cancer and its treatment have a considerable effect on the quality of life of women diagnosed with the disease. Currently, little is known about the perspectives of women regarding their experiences of living with ovarian cancer or the impact of recurrent disease. This article presents data from a national study of Canadian women living with ovarian cancer and describes the impact of the disease and its treatment. In this study, 93 women had recurrent disease, and 170 had not experienced recurrent disease. Women in both groups were similar, ranging in age from 21 to 61 years. Two-thirds of the women were married, and all were white. A greater proportion of the women with recurrent disease reported bowel problems; fears of dying, pain, getting around; and feelings of self-blame. On the average, women with recurrent disease reported experiencing more problems since diagnosis than those without recurrent disease (p = 0.01). The proportion of women who perceived that they received adequate help for their problems ranged from 20% to 85%. Implications for oncology nurses regarding assessment, referral for assistance, and patient education are apparent from the study findings.

Loading next page...
 
/lp/pubmed/women-s-perspectives-regarding-the-impact-of-ovarian-cancer-2tQzwtfGjV

References

References for this paper are not available at this time. We will be adding them shortly, thank you for your patience.

ISSN
0162-220X
DOI
10.1097/00002820-200010000-00006
pmid
11037956

Abstract

Ovarian cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in women. Ovarian cancer and its treatment have a considerable effect on the quality of life of women diagnosed with the disease. Currently, little is known about the perspectives of women regarding their experiences of living with ovarian cancer or the impact of recurrent disease. This article presents data from a national study of Canadian women living with ovarian cancer and describes the impact of the disease and its treatment. In this study, 93 women had recurrent disease, and 170 had not experienced recurrent disease. Women in both groups were similar, ranging in age from 21 to 61 years. Two-thirds of the women were married, and all were white. A greater proportion of the women with recurrent disease reported bowel problems; fears of dying, pain, getting around; and feelings of self-blame. On the average, women with recurrent disease reported experiencing more problems since diagnosis than those without recurrent disease (p = 0.01). The proportion of women who perceived that they received adequate help for their problems ranged from 20% to 85%. Implications for oncology nurses regarding assessment, referral for assistance, and patient education are apparent from the study findings.

Journal

Cancer nursingPubmed

Published: Nov 3, 2000

There are no references for this article.