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Academic Storytelling: A Critical Race Theory Story of Affirmative Action

Academic Storytelling: A Critical Race Theory Story of Affirmative Action The minority (nonwhite) can tell stories about institutional practices in academia that result in unintended benefits for the majority (white). One institutional practice in academia is affirmative action. This article presents a story about a minority applicant for a sociology position and his referral to an affirmative action program for recruiting minority faculty. One reason for telling the story is to illustrate how an affirmative action program can be implemented in a manner that marginalizes minority persons in the faculty recruitment process and results in benefits for majority persons. Another reason for telling the story is to sound an alarm for majority and minority faculty who support affirmative action programs that the programs can fall short of their goals if their implementation is simply treated as a bureaucratic activity in academia. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Sociological Perspectives SAGE

Academic Storytelling: A Critical Race Theory Story of Affirmative Action

Sociological Perspectives , Volume 43 (2): 21 – Jun 1, 2000

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References (131)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 2000 Pacific Sociological Association
ISSN
0731-1214
eISSN
1533-8673
DOI
10.2307/1389799
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The minority (nonwhite) can tell stories about institutional practices in academia that result in unintended benefits for the majority (white). One institutional practice in academia is affirmative action. This article presents a story about a minority applicant for a sociology position and his referral to an affirmative action program for recruiting minority faculty. One reason for telling the story is to illustrate how an affirmative action program can be implemented in a manner that marginalizes minority persons in the faculty recruitment process and results in benefits for majority persons. Another reason for telling the story is to sound an alarm for majority and minority faculty who support affirmative action programs that the programs can fall short of their goals if their implementation is simply treated as a bureaucratic activity in academia.

Journal

Sociological PerspectivesSAGE

Published: Jun 1, 2000

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