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Adult Children’s Problems and Mothers’ Well-Being

Adult Children’s Problems and Mothers’ Well-Being This article explores whether understanding of the effects of children’s problems on older parents’ well-being can be advanced by exploring differences in parent–child relationships within families. Using data from a study in which mothers reported on all adult children, we addressed the question: Do patterns of maternal favoritism moderate the impact of children’s problems on psychological well-being? Based on the literature on the effects of children’s problems and on parental favoritism, we hypothesized that problems in the lives of favored adult children will have a more detrimental impact than when they affect unfavored offspring. Results revealed strong and detrimental effects of any offspring’s problems on mothers’ well-being; these effects occurred, however, regardless of parental preference for an adult child. The findings suggest that the well-documented effects of parental preference may be limited in domains such as problems and difficult transitions in adult children’s lives. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research on Aging: An International Bimonthly Journal SAGE

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References (51)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2015
ISSN
0164-0275
eISSN
1552-7573
DOI
10.1177/0164027515611464
pmid
26482075
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article explores whether understanding of the effects of children’s problems on older parents’ well-being can be advanced by exploring differences in parent–child relationships within families. Using data from a study in which mothers reported on all adult children, we addressed the question: Do patterns of maternal favoritism moderate the impact of children’s problems on psychological well-being? Based on the literature on the effects of children’s problems and on parental favoritism, we hypothesized that problems in the lives of favored adult children will have a more detrimental impact than when they affect unfavored offspring. Results revealed strong and detrimental effects of any offspring’s problems on mothers’ well-being; these effects occurred, however, regardless of parental preference for an adult child. The findings suggest that the well-documented effects of parental preference may be limited in domains such as problems and difficult transitions in adult children’s lives.

Journal

Research on Aging: An International Bimonthly JournalSAGE

Published: Mar 1, 2017

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