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Against Innocence, against Evasion: Rowan Williams on Thinking and Speaking Tragedy

Against Innocence, against Evasion: Rowan Williams on Thinking and Speaking Tragedy ATR/100.2 Against Innocence, against Evasion: Rowan Williams on Thinking and Speaking Tragedy Joel C. Daniels* The Tragic Imagination. By Rowan Williams. The Literary Agenda. New York: Oxford University Press, 2016. vi + 168 pp. $24.95 (paper). In spite of its subsequent cultural importance, the moment of Greek dramatic tragedy was relatively short, and the details that would be helpful for understanding it are obscured by the mists of history. With roots in fifth-century BC Greece, ancient tragedies were staged in annual festivals dedicated to Dionysus. The tragedies were presented in groups of three, followed by a comic satyr play. More than one playwright would present each year. At the festival’s con- clusion, one dramatist would be recognized as superior and awarded the year’s prize. While there were likely hundreds of plays written over the course of the festivals, only thirty-three survive: seven by Aeschylus; seven by Sophocles; and nineteen by Euripides. Beyond bare details, little is known about the performances, their contexts, or how they were received. The tension between philosophy and the arts, generally, dates to that antique age: in Plato’s Republic, Socrates refers to the “an- cient quarrel” between them. However, some thinkers have found in tragedy http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Anglican Theological Review SAGE

Against Innocence, against Evasion: Rowan Williams on Thinking and Speaking Tragedy

Anglican Theological Review , Volume 100 (2): 1 – Aug 25, 2021

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References (2)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 2018 Anglican Theological Review Corporation
ISSN
0003-3286
eISSN
2163-6214
DOI
10.1177/000332861810000216
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ATR/100.2 Against Innocence, against Evasion: Rowan Williams on Thinking and Speaking Tragedy Joel C. Daniels* The Tragic Imagination. By Rowan Williams. The Literary Agenda. New York: Oxford University Press, 2016. vi + 168 pp. $24.95 (paper). In spite of its subsequent cultural importance, the moment of Greek dramatic tragedy was relatively short, and the details that would be helpful for understanding it are obscured by the mists of history. With roots in fifth-century BC Greece, ancient tragedies were staged in annual festivals dedicated to Dionysus. The tragedies were presented in groups of three, followed by a comic satyr play. More than one playwright would present each year. At the festival’s con- clusion, one dramatist would be recognized as superior and awarded the year’s prize. While there were likely hundreds of plays written over the course of the festivals, only thirty-three survive: seven by Aeschylus; seven by Sophocles; and nineteen by Euripides. Beyond bare details, little is known about the performances, their contexts, or how they were received. The tension between philosophy and the arts, generally, dates to that antique age: in Plato’s Republic, Socrates refers to the “an- cient quarrel” between them. However, some thinkers have found in tragedy

Journal

Anglican Theological ReviewSAGE

Published: Aug 25, 2021

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