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An Empirical Analysis of Umbrella Branding

An Empirical Analysis of Umbrella Branding In this article, the author studies the processes by which consumers’ quality perceptions of a brand in a product category are affected by their experience with the same brand in a different category. The model proposed and estimated explicitly incorporates some of the basic consumer behavior premises of signaling theory of umbrella branding (Montgomery and Wernerfelt 1992; Wernerfelt 1988). The author provides a framework to analyze the impact of marketing mix strategies in one product category on quality perceptions, consumer perceived risk, and consumer choice behavior in a different category. The model is estimated on panel data for two oral hygiene products, toothpaste and toothbrushes, in which a subset of brands share the same brand name across the two product categories. The results show strong support for the consumer premises of the signaling theory of umbrella branding. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Marketing Research SAGE

An Empirical Analysis of Umbrella Branding

Journal of Marketing Research , Volume 35 (3): 13 – Aug 1, 1998

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References (27)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 1998 American Marketing Association
ISSN
0022-2437
eISSN
1547-7193
DOI
10.1177/002224379803500305
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In this article, the author studies the processes by which consumers’ quality perceptions of a brand in a product category are affected by their experience with the same brand in a different category. The model proposed and estimated explicitly incorporates some of the basic consumer behavior premises of signaling theory of umbrella branding (Montgomery and Wernerfelt 1992; Wernerfelt 1988). The author provides a framework to analyze the impact of marketing mix strategies in one product category on quality perceptions, consumer perceived risk, and consumer choice behavior in a different category. The model is estimated on panel data for two oral hygiene products, toothpaste and toothbrushes, in which a subset of brands share the same brand name across the two product categories. The results show strong support for the consumer premises of the signaling theory of umbrella branding.

Journal

Journal of Marketing ResearchSAGE

Published: Aug 1, 1998

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